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On the Other Hand

Handedness, a conspicuous but enigmatic human trait, may be shared by other animals. What does it mean for evolution and brain function?

Concerns Raised Online Linger

Users of post-publication peer review forums like PubPeer often question perceived inaccuracies in scientific papers. Are the journals that published those papers paying attention?

Seeing Red

Reef fish, once thought to be unable to see red wavelengths, not only fluoresce deep red, but males of some species react to seeing their own bioluminescent pattern.

Reanimated Chickens and Zombie Dogs

In praise of weird science at the edge of life

Life in the Slow Lane

The speed of water flowing around coralline algae, a critical member of coral reef and coastal seaweed communities, affects their response to ocean acidification.

News & Opinion

Covering the life sciences inside and out

How to choose programs that suit your lab’s ’omics analysis needs

Ninety-nine publicly available genomes could help researchers working to develop diagnostics, vaccines, and therapies. 

image: Expanding ENCODE

Expanding ENCODE

By

Latest Encyclopedia of DNA Elements data enable researchers to compare genome regulation across species. 

Scientists use optogenetics to swap out negative memories for positive ones—and vice versa—in mice.

The Nutshell

Daily News Roundup

The ongoing Ebola outbreak has prompted the National Institutes of Health to accelerate human trials of multiple Ebola vaccines, starting this week.

ZMapp effectively rescued macaques from Ebola in a small trial, but it could be several months before supplies of the drug meet the growing human demand for it.

Genetic analysis reveals the history of the earliest human migrations in the region.

Sequencing the Ebola outbreak; optogenetic memory manipulation; monitoring post-publication peer review; yeast-based opioid production; even more ENCODE

Current Issue

September 2014

In addition to serving as a set of instructions to build an individual, the genome can influence neighboring organisms and, potentially, entire ecosystems.

Handedness, a conspicuous but enigmatic human trait, may be shared by other animals. What does it mean for evolution and brain function?

Now showing clinical progress against liver diseases, the gene-silencing technique begins to fulfill some of its promises.

Multimedia

Video, Slideshows, Infographics

Studying handedness in chimps may shed light on the mysterious trait in humans.

Johns Hopkins University Chemist Larry Principe discusses his favorite alchemy painting, the topic of this month’s Foundations.

The Marketplace

New Product Press Releases

New BOCHEM® Lift 240 electrically powered laboratory support jack from Bochem Instrumente GmbH.

Torrey Pines Scientific, Inc. announces its new EchoTherm™ Model SC25XT.

New Synergy HTX Offers Convenient, Flexible and Automated Microplate-based Detection

New confocal technology enables fast and sensitive superresolution microscopy.

BioTek’s Gen5 Software Offers CVB Relative Potency Solution.

The EZ-2 ENVI from Genevac is designed for gentle evaporation of volatile environmental samples.

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Featured Comment

Marie-Paule Kieny started off her comment oh so right, but then continued oh so wrong.  In this case, forget the bioethicists. Kieny should have said, "We need to tell the bioethicists that there is no other choice."


- Unknown, Bioethics of Experimental Ebola Treatments
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