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Inspired by Nature

Researchers are borrowing designs from the natural world to advance biomedicine.

Half Mile Down, 1934

In his bathysphere, William Beebe plumbed the ocean to record-setting depths.

How to Make a New Species

Scientists mutate a mating pheromone and its corresponding receptor in yeast to promote speciation.

Sold on Symbiosis

A love of the ocean lured Nicole Dubilier into science; gutless sea worms and their nurturing bacterial symbionts keep her at the leading edge of marine microbiology.

Driven to Extinction

The eradication of smallpox set the standard for the global elimination of a devastating infectious disease. Will the ongoing polio and guinea worm campaigns be as successful?

Tools for Drools

A general guide to collecting and processing saliva

Sponging Up Phosphorus

Symbiotic bacteria in Caribbean reef sponges store polyphosphate granules, possibly explaining why phosphorous is so scarce in coral reef ecosystems.

News & Opinion

Covering the life sciences inside and out

Researchers deploy ancestors of today’s adeno-associated viruses to deliver gene therapies without immune system interference.

Scientists build a specialized ribosome with linked subunits that can translate designer transcripts in bacteria.

image: Moving MERS Therapies Forward

Moving MERS Therapies Forward

By

Scientists wonder whether they can obtain the resources to test experimental vaccines and treatments in humans.

image: Behavior Brief

Behavior Brief

By

A round-up of recent discoveries in behavior research

The Nutshell

Daily News Roundup

The Ontario Superior Court of Justice rules that the Canadian Broadcasting Company did not commit libel in its documentary series on fraud allegations against Ranjit Chandra.

Scientists air their most embarrassing fieldwork flubs on Twitter.

An experimental vaccine against Ebola virus disease may completely protect people against infection, according to a clinical study in Guinea.

Ethical breaches in a study on the benefits of so-called “golden rice” lead to the paper being pulled from the literature.

Current Issue

August 2015

Humans have spiked ecosystems with a flood of active pharmaceuticals. The drugs are feminizing male fish, confusing birds, and worrying scientists.

Researchers are borrowing designs from the natural world to advance biomedicine.

The maternal-fetal interface plays important roles in the health of both mother and baby, even after birth.

This year marks the 150th anniversary of an autopsy report describing the first known case of a sexual development disorder.

Multimedia

Video, Slideshows, Infographics

Meet Wolf Reik, August Profilee and Babraham Institute director of research.

Learn more about biliary atresia, a disease that inflicts newborn babies and young lambs whose mothers eat poisonous plants.

The Marketplace

New Product Press Releases

The Ultravap Levante™ is a new introduction to Porvair Sciences’ popular series of nitrogen blow-down sample concentrators and evaporators.

Evaporator System for Academic Multi-User Environments

Fast evaporation from vacuum-assisted vortex concentration technology

Lonza to Expand the Availability of the RAFT™ 3D Cell Culture System.

High Performance Multi-Mode Microplate Reader

AMSBIO has launched a new range of human exosomes.

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    Putting the microbiome front and center in health care, in preventive strategies, and in health-risk assessments could stem the epidemic of noncommunicable diseases.

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Featured Comment

Marie-Paule Kieny started off her comment oh so right, but then continued oh so wrong.  In this case, forget the bioethicists. Kieny should have said, "We need to tell the bioethicists that there is no other choice."


- Unknown, Bioethics of Experimental Ebola Treatments