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The Sooner, The Better

New approaches to diagnosing bacterial infections may one day allow the identification of pathogens and their antibiotic susceptibility in a matter of hours or minutes.

Fatty Pheromones

A new class of pheromones, triacylglycerides, helps male fruit flies mark their mates to deter rivals.

Imaging Intercourse, 1493

For centuries, scientists have been trying to understand the mechanics of human intercourse. MRI technology made it possible for them to get an inside view.

Bird’s-Eye Proteomics

A guide to mass spectrometers that can handle the top-down-proteomics challenge

Size Matters

The disproportionately endowed carabid beetle reveals that the size of female—and not just male—genitalia influences insemination success.

News & Opinion

Covering the life sciences inside and out

image: Genome Digest

Genome Digest

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What researchers are learning as they sequence, map, and decode species’ genomes

A transgene designed to attract methylation to the promoter of a tumor-suppressor gene leads to tumorigenesis in a mouse model. 

image: Light’s Dark Side

Light’s Dark Side

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Exposure to dim light at night speeds the growth of human breast cancer tumors implanted into rats and makes the cancer resistant to the drug tamoxifen.

Researchers find that a type of neurodegeneration in mice is linked to ribosomal stalling during protein translation in the brain.

The Nutshell

Daily News Roundup

Health officials report the first case Ebola virus disease outside of Guinea, Liberia, and Sierra Leone. A 40-year-old man from Nigeria has died.

Researchers use light-sheet microscopy to map central nervous system activity in zebrafish larvae.

A feather-covered herbivorous dinosaur offers a surprising perspective on plumage. 

A high-security tuberculosis lab at the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention may return to transferring hazardous materials.

Current Issue

July 2014

Sexual selection doesn’t end when females choose a mate. Females and males of many animal species employ an array of tactics to stack the deck in their reproductive favor.

Birds do it. Bees do it. We do it. But not without a physical, biochemical, and genetic price. How did the costly practice of sex become so commonplace?

Across the animal kingdom, dominance isn’t the only way for a male to score. Colluding, sneaking around, or cross-dressing can work, too.

Multimedia

Video, Slideshows, Infographics

Flying dinos, genetic pacemakers, and dangerous microbes on the loose

Watch flightless dung beetles (Circellium bacchus), sneaky copulators and crap connoisseurs, do their thing in South Africa.

The Marketplace

New Product Press Releases

The DrySyn MULTI converts any standard hotplate stirrer into a high performance reaction block.

It All Stems From Here: Lonza’s New L7TM Human Pluripotent Stem Cell Solution.

Electrothermal’s extensive histology range updated with new Paraffin Section Flotation Bath.

Asynt announces PressureSyn – the new, state-of-the-art, 125ml working volume high pressure reactor.

INTEGRA VIAFLO 96 multichannel pipette.

Mystaire® Inc, Creedmoor NC announces the release of Aura® Elite Ductless Fume Hood.

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Featured Comment

Trying to get a permanent job in academia is like driving a car into a crowded parking lot. Good luck! In this era of automation, there is no job that is safe. But for Ph.D.s, there is usually no job.


- Salticidologist, Can Publication Records Predict Future PIs?
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