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Nanomedicine

From bioimaging to drug delivery and therapeutics, nanotechnology is poised to change the way doctors practice medicine.

Anatomy for Everybody

Meet Vanessa Ruiz, the medical illustrator behind the popular art blog Street Anatomy.

See-through Mice

An improved tissue-clearing technique makes whole animals transparent.

The Love Bug

A mysterious iridovirus outbreak in a lab colony of crickets reveals the virus’s ability to spur increased sexual activity.

The Sooner, The Better

New approaches to diagnosing bacterial infections may one day allow the identification of pathogens and their antibiotic susceptibility in a matter of hours or minutes.

Spineless Sex

Not to be outdone by vertebrates, invertebrates employ a suite of interesting structures and behaviors to accomplish procreation.

News & Opinion

Covering the life sciences inside and out

A Colombian graduate student is being charged with copyright infringement for posting another scientist’s thesis online—a crime punishable by up to eight years in jail.

image: Anatomy for Everybody

Anatomy for Everybody

By

Meet Vanessa Ruiz, the medical illustrator behind the popular art blog Street Anatomy.

image: Mosaic Mutations

Mosaic Mutations

By

Some genetic abnormalities that appear to have sprung up independently in children are in fact present in a portion of their parents’ cells.

An improved tissue-clearing technique makes whole animals transparent.

The Nutshell

Daily News Roundup

Health officials the world over pledge to help contain the worst-ever Ebola outbreak ongoing in West Africa, as regulators grapple with evaluating potential treatments and vaccines.

Deep-sea octopus has the longest-known brooding period known for any animal species.

A study linking GlaxoSmithKline’s Pandemrix H1N1 vaccine to the sleep disorder has been pulled from the literature.

See-through organs and animals; distinguishing white from brown and beige fat cells; chipping away at genetic mosaicism; catching up with the blogger behind Street Anatomy

Current Issue

August 2014

Nearly 30 years after the discovery of tiny barrel-shape structures called vaults, their natural functions remain elusive. Nevertheless, researchers are beginning to put these nanoparticles to work in biomedicine.

From bioimaging to drug delivery and therapeutics, nanotechnology is poised to change the way doctors practice medicine.

Research on the human microbiome is booming, and scientists have moved from simply taking stock of gut flora to understanding the influence of microbes throughout the body.

Multimedia

Video, Slideshows, Infographics

Through her Street Anatomy blog, medical illustrator Vanessa Ruiz has connected with a diverse array of arists who draw inspiration from the human body.

Supercentenarian Hendrikje van Andel-Schipper appeared on CNN in 2009, before donating her body to science and yielding insights into her remarkable longevity.

The Marketplace

New Product Press Releases

New Sensitive Amp’d™ GLP-1 ELISA Kit for the Rapid Detection of Glucagon-Like Peptide 1.

New Eppendorf cell culture consumables deliver quality in all.

MicOS is the most cost effective and flexible microspectrometer solution for your luminescence measurement needs.

New EMCCD and Scientific CMOS Cameras are Perfect for Low Light Imaging Applications.

HORIBA Scientific Debuts New SyncerityTM Camera with Back-Illuminated NIR CCD Sensor.

High Resolution, High Sensitivity and Stability For the Most Challenging Applications.

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Featured Comment

Trying to get a permanent job in academia is like driving a car into a crowded parking lot. Good luck! In this era of automation, there is no job that is safe. But for Ph.D.s, there is usually no job.


- Salticidologist, Can Publication Records Predict Future PIs?
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