Advertisement

Incentivizing Breakthroughs

With scientific funding on shaky ground, big-dollar competitions offer a new way for life-science innovators to bring their ideas to fruition.

Capsule Reviews

Your Atomic Self, Eureka!, A Talent for Friendship, and Undeniable

Along Came a Spider

Researchers are turning to venom peptides to protect crops from their most devastating pests.

Sorting Made Simpler

A guide to affordable, compact fluorescence-activated cell sorters

Speaking of Science

December 2014's selection of notable quotes

A Cellar’s Cellular Treasure, 1992

A spring cleaning led to the rediscovery of Theodor Boveri’s microscope slides, presumed lost during World War II.

A Race Against Extinction

Bat populations ravaged; hundreds of amphibian species driven to extinction; diverse groups of birds threatened. Taking risks will be necessary to control deadly wildlife pathogens.

News & Opinion

Covering the life sciences inside and out

The Scientist’s standout videos and slideshows of the year.

image: New Species Galore

New Species Galore

By

A look back at the latest microbes, plants, and animals to have secured a spot in science’s known tree of life in 2014

image: Science Setbacks: 2014

Science Setbacks: 2014

By

This year in life science was marked by paltry federal funding increases, revelations of sequence contamination, and onerous regulations.

From artificial chromosomes to mind-controlled gene expression, scientists pushed the boundaries of manipulating biology this year.

The Nutshell

Daily News Roundup

People who read from light-emitting electronic devices before bedtime may suffer poorer-quality sleep, researchers show.

A new microscope attachment can allow smartphone users to take a closer look at fluorescently labeled DNA.

The pharmaceutical giant will pay an undisclosed price to acquire Bina Technologies.

RIKEN’s Haruko Obokata fails to replicate stimulus-triggered acquisition of pluripotency.

Current Issue

December 2014

Bat populations ravaged; hundreds of amphibian species driven to extinction; diverse groups of birds threatened. Taking risks will be necessary to control deadly wildlife pathogens.

Bats harbor diverse pathogens, including Ebola, Marburg, SARS, and MERS viruses. Understanding why could help researchers stymie deadly emerging diseases.

The list of the year’s best new products contains both perennial winners and innovative newcomers.

A spring cleaning led to the rediscovery of Theodor Boveri’s microscope slides, presumed lost during World War II.

Multimedia

Video, Slideshows, Infographics

Watch scenes from the 2013 World Dairy Expo, where KHW Regiment Apple-Red-ET won the reserve championship while her clone took home the grand championship.

Meet the researchers behind ATHENA, the project that aims to create a system of linked model human organs that may revolutionize drug development.

The Marketplace

New Product Press Releases

Robust, reliable operation for single and dual culture modes.

Leica Microsystems Previews Light Sheet Module for Confocal Microscope for Gentle and Fast Live Imaging

INTEGRA has introduced a Three Position Stage for its VIAFLO 96 and VIAFLO 384 handheld benchtop pipettes.

The new Micronic 24-2 rack accommodates twenty-four 3.00ml tissue storage tubes.

Irvine Scientific Introduces DMSO-Free, Chemically-Defined Cryopreservation Solution for Mesenchymal Stem Cells

Universal Hybrid Detector for Single Molecule Detection and Imaging.

Follow The Scientist

icon-facebook icon-linkedin icon-twitter icon-vimeo icon-youtube
Advertisement

Stay Connected with The Scientist

  • icon-facebook The Scientist Magazine
  • icon-facebook The Scientist Careers
  • icon-facebook Neuroscience Research Techniques
  • icon-facebook Genetic Research Techniques
  • icon-facebook Cell Culture Techniques
  • icon-facebook Microbiology and Immunology
  • icon-facebook Cancer Research and Technology
  • icon-facebook Stem Cell and Regenerative Science
Advertisement
Mettler Toledo
Mettler Toledo

Featured Comment

Marie-Paule Kieny started off her comment oh so right, but then continued oh so wrong.  In this case, forget the bioethicists. Kieny should have said, "We need to tell the bioethicists that there is no other choice."


- Unknown, Bioethics of Experimental Ebola Treatments
Advertisement
Life Technologies