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Resisting Cancer

If one out of three people develops cancer, that means two others don’t. Understanding why could lead to insights relevant to prevention and treatment.

Professional Marksman

Charles Sawyers, who began his research career just as the genetic details of human oncogenes were emerging, codeveloped Gleevec, the quintessential targeted cancer therapy.

Bursting Cancer’s Bubble

Scientists make oxygen-filled microbubbles designed to increase tumor sensitivity to radiation.

The Challenges of Precision

Researchers face roadblocks to treating an individual patient’s cancer as a unique disease.

Mining the Outliers

Even when a clinical trial fails, some patients improve. What can researchers learn from these exceptional responders?

News & Opinion

Covering the life sciences inside and out

Metabolites produced by gut microbes in mice can affect the animals’ circadian rhythm and metabolism. 

image: Genome Digest

Genome Digest

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What researchers are learning as they sequence, map, and decode species’ genomes

image: Cancer Sequencing Controls

Cancer Sequencing Controls

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Comparing a patient’s tumor DNA sequence with that of her normal tissue can improve researchers’ identification of disease-associated mutations.

Submissions are officially open for this year’s Top 10 Innovations contest.

The Nutshell

Daily News Roundup

In the midst of a debate about an experimental drug’s early approval, the US Food and Drug Administration requests that full trial results be released.

Nature journals will ask authors to authenticate cell lines used in manuscript submissions starting next month.

Personalized pancreatic cancer therapies based on tumor genomics may take too long to prepare to be helpful, according to a small clinical trial.

The largest and longest study of the long-term, regular aspirin use finds that the drug may lead to a modestly reduced risk for some types of gastrointestinal cancers.

Current Issue

April 2015

Diverse mammals, including humans, have been found to carry distinct genomes in their cells. What does such genetic chimerism mean for health and disease?

Personal drug regimens based on xenograft mice harboring a single patient’s tumor still need to prove their true utility in medicine.

If one out of three people develops cancer, that means two others don’t. Understanding why could lead to insights relevant to prevention and treatment.

Scientists make oxygen-filled microbubbles designed to increase tumor sensitivity to radiation.

Multimedia

Video, Slideshows, Infographics

Cornell researchers probe the brains of jumping spiders to gain insight into the arachnid's visual processing capabilities.

Scientist to Watch Yvonne Saenger explains recent advances in using biomarkers to identify cancer patients who might benefit most from immunotherapy.

The Marketplace

New Product Press Releases

Features user friendly touchscreen operation which enables a wide range of programmed injection applications.

Personal cytometer for life science research, bioprocessing, water quality and many other applications.

New Balances Support Lean Processes and Bring Comfort to Daily Weighing Tasks

More than 50% lighter than conventional racks, yet don't compromise on strength and are completely recyclable.

Enables More Informed Casework Decisions.

Software provides simple but powerful solution for designing CRISPR experiments.

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Sigma-Aldrich
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Featured Comment

Marie-Paule Kieny started off her comment oh so right, but then continued oh so wrong.  In this case, forget the bioethicists. Kieny should have said, "We need to tell the bioethicists that there is no other choice."


- Unknown, Bioethics of Experimental Ebola Treatments