Marching Into an Uncertain Future

What's next for science advocacy after the March for Science?

Marching for Science, from Berlin to Sydney

Satellite marches across the globe aim to stand in solidarity with US scientists.

Tracking the Evolutionary History of a Tumor

Analyzing single cell sequences to decipher the evolution of a tumor

Notable Science Quotes

Eugene Garfield, the cancer moonshot, employee genetic testing, and more

News & Opinion

Covering the life sciences inside and out

The Scientist's Bob Grant and Tracy Vence are in the nation's capital, covering the demonstration designed to celebrate the research enterprise and advocate for evidence-based policymaking.

The Scientist's Kerry Grens is in Chicago, covering the demonstration designed to celebrate the research enterprise and advocate for evidence-based policymaking.

The Scientist's Diana Kwon is in Berlin, Germany, covering the demonstration designed to celebrate the research enterprise and advocate for evidence-based policymaking.

Can professional organizations and societies parlay the groundswell of support culminating in this weekend’s March for Science into more-effective science advocacy?

The Nutshell

Daily News Roundup

Scientists predict rodents’ ages by assessing DNA methylation markers in various tissues.

The blood-testing startup settles a legal dispute with the Arizona attorney general’s office.

March for Science edition

The bacterium causes eggs to die, and spreading treated insects is expected to curb Aedes aegypti populations.

Current Issue

April 2017

Issue Cover: Targeting Tumors

Researchers unravel the sophisticated ways cancers evade treatments, including immunotherapies, designed to destroy them.

Tumors’ mutations can encode the seeds of their own destruction, in the form of immunogenic peptides recognized by T cells.

Across many diseases, taking medication at specific times of day may make the therapy more effective.

In the middle of the 20th century, the National Cancer Institute began testing plant extracts for chemotherapeutic potential—helping to discover some drugs still in use today.

Multimedia

Video, Slideshows, Infographics

Thousands of scientists and science supporters marched from the Washington Monument to the US Capitol this weekend.

Thousands of people around the world gathered to show support for science today. Here’s a sampling of sights and signs from the Marches for Science in Berlin, Chicago, and Washington, DC.

The Marketplace

Sponsored Product Updates

Fluorescent Multiplex Detection of Proteins in Western Blots

INTEGRA offers a range of high quality multichannel reservoirs that feature reusable bases. 

The new platform processes thousands of cells per day, providing scalable, sensitive, single-cell sequencing.

The CellTram® 4 Air is a pneumatic injector ideal for gentle holding of cells.  

Conjugate Check&Go! Kit and is the Company’s second lateral flow product specific to antibody labeling.

Automates data capture and cell assessment around-the-clock, inside the incubator 

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Featured Comment

    Cutting American science does not make it "great again." Quite the opposite. 

- Neurona, Trump’s Proposed Budget Would Cut Science Funding
 
 
 
AAAS