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Crossing Boundaries

A groundbreaker in the study of Listeria monocytogenes, Pascale Cossart continues to build her research tool kit to understand how to fight such intracellular human pathogens.

Keeping Up with IP

It’s never too early to start thinking about intellectual property rights—even for biologists doing basic research.

Surviving the Ice Age

A beginner’s guide to freezing and thawing pluripotent stem cells

Banking on iPSCs

A flurry of induced pluripotent stem cell banks are coming online, but they face significant business challenges.

Beyond the Blueprint

In addition to serving as a set of instructions to build an individual, the genome can influence neighboring organisms and, potentially, entire ecosystems.

On the Other Hand

Handedness, a conspicuous but enigmatic human trait, may be shared by other animals. What does it mean for evolution and brain function?

The Second Coming of RNAi

Now showing clinical progress against liver diseases, the gene-silencing technique begins to fulfill some of its promises.

News & Opinion

Covering the life sciences inside and out

The Scientist’s annual search for the best and brightest life science innovations is drawing to a close. Submit your new product or methodology today for a chance to win!

An external device that mimics the structure of a spleen can cleanse the blood of rats with acute sepsis, ridding the fluid of pathogens and toxins.

Farms support less phylogenetically diverse bird populations than forests, but some farms are better than others.

image: Bacteria Boost Viral Vaccine Response

Bacteria Boost Viral Vaccine Response

By

Gut microbes enhance response to the seasonal flu shot in mice.

The Nutshell

Daily News Roundup

Most complete skeleton suggests the dinosaurs were semi-aquatic hunters. 

Two coauthors on the now-retracted stimulus-triggered acquisition of pluripotency studies present yet another revision to the published method.

An analysis of bacterial sequences from the Human Microbiome Project has uncovered thousands of biosynthetic gene clusters.

Researchers at the RIKEN Center for Developmental Biology will treat the first patient in its clinical trial testing an induced pluripotent stem cell-based treatment for age-related macular degeneration.

Current Issue

September 2014

In addition to serving as a set of instructions to build an individual, the genome can influence neighboring organisms and, potentially, entire ecosystems.

Handedness, a conspicuous but enigmatic human trait, may be shared by other animals. What does it mean for evolution and brain function?

Now showing clinical progress against liver diseases, the gene-silencing technique begins to fulfill some of its promises.

Multimedia

Video, Slideshows, Infographics

Studying handedness in chimps may shed light on the mysterious trait in humans.

Johns Hopkins University Chemist Larry Principe discusses his favorite alchemy painting, the topic of this month’s Foundations.

The Marketplace

New Product Press Releases

To Help Reduce the Cost of Failure and Increase the Chance of Clinical Success

New BOCHEM® Lift 240 electrically powered laboratory support jack from Bochem Instrumente GmbH.

Torrey Pines Scientific, Inc. announces its new EchoTherm™ Model SC25XT.

New Synergy HTX Offers Convenient, Flexible and Automated Microplate-based Detection

New confocal technology enables fast and sensitive superresolution microscopy.

BioTek’s Gen5 Software Offers CVB Relative Potency Solution.

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Featured Comment

Marie-Paule Kieny started off her comment oh so right, but then continued oh so wrong.  In this case, forget the bioethicists. Kieny should have said, "We need to tell the bioethicists that there is no other choice."


- Unknown, Bioethics of Experimental Ebola Treatments
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