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Jef Akst

Recent Articles

image: Northern Exposure

Northern Exposure

By | March 1, 2014

Researchers are using snowdrifts to artificially warm Arctic tundra during winter and finding that more carbon is released from the soil than plants can soak up from the atmosphere.

image: RNA Origins

RNA Origins

By | March 1, 2014

See March 2014 Scientist to Watch Matthew Powner explain his work exploring the chemical origins of life on Earth.

image: RNA World 2.0

RNA World 2.0

By | March 1, 2014

Most scientists believe that ribonucleic acid played a key role in the origin of life on Earth, but the versatile molecule isn’t the whole story.  

image: Hwang Convictions Upheld

Hwang Convictions Upheld

By | February 28, 2014

Just two weeks after discredited stem cell scientist Woo Suk Hwang received a US patent for his fraudulent work, his luck runs short as his convictions of embezzlement and bioethics violations are upheld.

image: Next Generation: Seeing Brain Tumors

Next Generation: Seeing Brain Tumors

By | February 27, 2014

A new camera system supports the visualization of gliomas stained with Tumor Paint, a chlorotoxin-based imaging agent that’s currently in clinical trials.

image: PLOS Pushes Data Sharing

PLOS Pushes Data Sharing

By | February 25, 2014

The open-access publisher has updated its policies, requiring authors to include information on how the public can obtain the raw data behind their research results.

image: Paper-Based Cancer Test?

Paper-Based Cancer Test?

By | February 25, 2014

Nanoscale agents that detect disease-associated synthetic biomarkers in urine could one day streamline the diagnosis of tumors, heart disease, and more.

image: Preventing Fear

Preventing Fear

By | February 24, 2014

Scientists identify hippocampal neurons involved in encoding fear in mice.

image: How a Microbe Resists Its Own Antibiotics

How a Microbe Resists Its Own Antibiotics

By | February 20, 2014

Researchers reveal the molecular mechanisms of Streptomyces platensis’s defense from its own antibiotics, which inhibit fatty acid synthesis in other microbes.

image: Monkey Mind Control

Monkey Mind Control

By | February 19, 2014

The brain activity of one monkey dictated movements of a second, sedated animal, a study shows.

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Mettler Toledo
BD Biosciences
BD Biosciences