Annie Gottlieb

Recent Articles

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Capsule Reviews

By | July 1, 2013

Denial, Probably Approximately Correct, Permanent Present Tense, and Against Their Will

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Capsule Reviews

By | May 1, 2013

The Bonobo and the Atheist, The Philadelphia Chromosome, Lone Survivors, and Paleofantasy

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Capsule Reviews

By | April 1, 2013

Leopold, The Drunken Botanist, Beautiful Whale, and Between Man and Beast

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Capsule Reviews

By | March 1, 2013

The Undead, Frankenstein's Cat, The Universe Within, and Physics in Mind

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Capsule Reviews

By | February 1, 2013

The Science of Love, Bad Pharma, Genes, Cells and Brains, and Nature Wars

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Capsule Reviews

By | December 1, 2012

Unusual Creatures, Extinct Boids, The Mating Lives of Birds and A World in One Cubic Foot

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Capsule Reviews

By | November 1, 2012

Spillover, Answers for Aristotle, Who’s in Charge? and Science Set Free

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Capsule Reviews

By | October 1, 2012

Regenesis and The Half-Life of Facts

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Capsule Reviews

By | September 1, 2012

Wired for Story, Dreamland, Homo Mysterious, and Vagina

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Capsule Reviews

By | August 1, 2012

Gifts of the Crow, What the Robin Knows, The Unfeathered Bird, and America’s Other Audubon

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