Ruth Williams

Recent Articles

image: Synthetic Sensors

Synthetic Sensors

By | December 1, 2016

Engineered circuits detect endogenous transcription factors to drive cellular outputs.

image: Infographic: How to Build a Synthetic Sensor

Infographic: How to Build a Synthetic Sensor

By | December 1, 2016

Scientists designed a genetic sensor-and-readout system, based on detecting a transcription factor, that performs a custom cellular activity.

image: Next Generation: Super-Fast Tracking of Single Molecules

Next Generation: Super-Fast Tracking of Single Molecules

By | November 23, 2016

A clever twist on a super-resolution microscopy technique improves the temporal resolution of single-molecule tracking. 

image: Genetic Modification Improves Photosynthetic Efficiency

Genetic Modification Improves Photosynthetic Efficiency

By | November 17, 2016

Researchers enhance the photosynthetic yield of tobacco plants with genetic engineering.

image: Predicting Scientific Success

Predicting Scientific Success

By | November 3, 2016

A scientist’s most influential paper may come at any point in her career but chances are it won’t change her overall success, researchers show.

image: Neural Connectome Method Uses mRNA Barcodes

Neural Connectome Method Uses mRNA Barcodes

By | November 1, 2016

Researchers swap microscopy for RNA sequencing to track neural paths in the mouse brain.  

image: Genetic Tags Illuminate Where Neurons Extend

Genetic Tags Illuminate Where Neurons Extend

By | November 1, 2016

Barcodes of mRNA travel to the cells' axon terminals, offering a sequencing-based approach to neural mapping.

image: How Experience Shapes Adult Neurogenesis

How Experience Shapes Adult Neurogenesis

By | October 27, 2016

Interneurons and mature granule cells in the adult mouse brain are critical for newborn neurons’ responses to novel environments.

image: Nixing NETs to Prevent Metastasis

Nixing NETs to Prevent Metastasis

By | October 19, 2016

Researchers discover that neutrophil extracellular traps help cancers spread, and design enzyme-loaded nanoparticles to destroy them.

image: Deep-Sea Viruses Destroy Archaea

Deep-Sea Viruses Destroy Archaea

By | October 12, 2016

Viruses are responsible for the majority of archaea deaths on the deep ocean floors, scientists show.

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