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image: Mammalian Immunity: What’s RNAi Got to Do with It?

Mammalian Immunity: What’s RNAi Got to Do with It?

By | July 21, 2017

A new study adds to the evidence that mammalian cells can use small interfering RNAs to defend against viruses, but questions remain about physiological importance.

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image: Image of the Day: Itty Bitty Cell Sucker

Image of the Day: Itty Bitty Cell Sucker

By | July 21, 2017

With a diameter smaller than 100 nanometers, this nanopipette’s indiscernible tip is tiny enough to suck up minute contents of a single cell. 

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image: Demonstrating Discontent, May 21, 1990

Demonstrating Discontent, May 21, 1990

By | July 17, 2017

Activists demanded greater access to and involvement in clinical research for AIDS treatments—and their protests were heard.

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image: Notable Science Quotes

Notable Science Quotes

By | July 17, 2017

The NIH budget, the nature of science, paternal age, and more

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Using single-cell RNA sequencing, scientists characterize new populations of dendritic cells and monocytes.

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image: Lawmakers Propose Increasing NIH Budget

Lawmakers Propose Increasing NIH Budget

By | July 13, 2017

A House bill would also bar funding for research with fetal tissues.

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image: Smallpox Kerfuffle Reveals Biosecurity Problems

Smallpox Kerfuffle Reveals Biosecurity Problems

By | July 12, 2017

A review of a 2014 incident in which mystery vials of smallpox were found at the NIH reveals security weaknesses, but also concludes the response was appropriate. 

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image: Senators Bemoan Science Funding Cuts

Senators Bemoan Science Funding Cuts

By | June 23, 2017

At appropriations subcommittee hearings, President Trump’s budget proposal gets dissed by Republicans and Democrats.

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image: T Cells That Drive Toxic Shock in Mice Identified

T Cells That Drive Toxic Shock in Mice Identified

By | June 20, 2017

Overzealous activity by mucosa-associated invariant T (MAIT) cells in response to bacterial toxins can lead to illness instead of stopping it.

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Research shows that human immunity develops much earlier than previously thought, but functions differently in adults.

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