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A 3-D carbon nanotube mesh enables rat spinal tissue sections to reconnect in culture.

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image: Allen Institute Launches Brain Observatory

Allen Institute Launches Brain Observatory

By | July 13, 2016

The first data include real-time neural activity in the visual cortex of mice observing pictures and videos.

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image: Demystifying the Brain’s GPS

Demystifying the Brain’s GPS

By | July 12, 2016

Studies in rodents are beginning to reveal how mammalian navigational sense works.

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image: Blind Mice Regain Vision

Blind Mice Regain Vision

By | July 11, 2016

A combination of visual stimulation and chemical growth promotion leads damaged retinal nerves to regenerate in mice.

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Mismatched ancestral origins of mitochondrial and nuclear DNA boost mouse health.

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image: Immune Cell–Stem Cell Cooperation

Immune Cell–Stem Cell Cooperation

By , and | July 1, 2016

Understanding interactions between the immune system and stem cells could pave the way for successful stem cell–based regenerative therapies.

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image: Immune Cells' Role in Tissue Maintenance and Repair

Immune Cells' Role in Tissue Maintenance and Repair

By , and | July 1, 2016

The cells of the mammalian immune system do more than just fight off pathogens; they are also important players in stem cell function and are thus crucial for maintaining homeostasis and recovering from injury.

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image: Exercise-Induced Muscle Factor Promotes Memory

Exercise-Induced Muscle Factor Promotes Memory

By | June 23, 2016

Running releases an enzyme that is associated with memory function in mice and humans.  

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image: Altered Sense of Touch in Autism?

Altered Sense of Touch in Autism?

By | June 10, 2016

A mouse study suggests that disruptions to nerves in the skin may contribute to autism spectrum disorder.

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image: Gut Microbiota–Obesity Link Clarified

Gut Microbiota–Obesity Link Clarified

By | June 10, 2016

Changes in diet can cause gut microbes to produce acetate, which in turn stimulates insulin secretion and obesity in rodents, scientists show.

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