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image: Genes Tied to Wasps Recognizing Faces

Genes Tied to Wasps Recognizing Faces

By | June 14, 2017

The brains of Polistes paper wasps express different genes when identifying faces than when distinguishing between simple patterns, a study finds.

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image: Study: One Wasp Takes Control of Another

Study: One Wasp Takes Control of Another

By | January 25, 2017

Crypt keeper wasps appear to command crypt gall wasps to dig exit tunnels on their behalf.

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image: Parasite’s Genes Persist in Host Genomes

Parasite’s Genes Persist in Host Genomes

By | September 17, 2015

Researchers find evidence of gene flow from parasitoid wasps to the butterflies and moths they lay eggs in.

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image: Celebrating New Species

Celebrating New Species

By | May 21, 2015

An international panel of scientists selects the 10 most interesting organisms discovered last year.

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image: Sequencing the Underdogs

Sequencing the Underdogs

By | March 8, 2013

Transcriptome studies reveal new insights about unusual animals whose genomes have not been sequenced.

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image: Yeast's Wasp Winter Retreat

Yeast's Wasp Winter Retreat

By | July 30, 2012

Wasps harbor yeast in their guts all winter long, then spread the microbes among wineries and vineyards.

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image: Boozing for Better Health

Boozing for Better Health

By | February 16, 2012

Fruit flies consume alcohol to kill off parasites.

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image: Behavior Brief

Behavior Brief

By | September 13, 2011

A round-up of recent discoveries in behavior research

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