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image: Vlad Denic on Exploring New Fields and Failing Successfully

Vlad Denic on Exploring New Fields and Failing Successfully

By | December 1, 2016

The Harvard professor is pursuing fundamental questions about autophagy, protein homeostasis, and other cellular processes, and he’s always on the lookout for his next new topic.

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image: Protein Folding Pioneer Dies

Protein Folding Pioneer Dies

By | October 28, 2016

Susan Lindquist of MIT and the Whitehead Institute broke scientific ground on prions and heat shock proteins.

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image: Prions in Plants?

Prions in Plants?

By | April 26, 2016

A plant protein that behaves like a prion when inserted into yeast could enable a form of botanical memory, a study suggests.

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image: Fearless about Folding

Fearless about Folding

By | January 1, 2016

Susan Lindquist has never shied away from letting her curiosity guide her research career.

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image: Master Folder

Master Folder

By | January 1, 2016

Meet Susan Lindquist, the MIT biologist who has won numerous accolades for her research on protein folding.

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image: Cracking the Complex

Cracking the Complex

By | November 1, 2015

Using mass spec to study protein-protein interactions

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image: How We Age

How We Age

By | March 1, 2015

From DNA damage to cellular miscommunication, aging is a mysterious and multifarious process.

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image: Protein Helps Cells Adapt—or Die

Protein Helps Cells Adapt—or Die

By | July 3, 2014

Scientists show how cell stress both prevents and promotes cell suicide in a study that’s equally divisive.

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | January 1, 2014

Meet some of the people featured in the January 2014 issue of The Scientist.

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image: The Bright Side of Prions

The Bright Side of Prions

By | January 1, 2014

Associated with numerous neurological diseases, misfolded proteins may also play decisive roles in normal cellular functioning.  

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