The Scientist

» microscopy and developmental biology

Most Recent

image: Image of the Day: A Swell Idea

Image of the Day: A Swell Idea

By | July 19, 2017

To improve the resolution of biological samples at the cellular level, researchers inflate tissues with “swellable polymers” so that they’re easier to see under the microscope.    

0 Comments

image: Image of the Day: Skinning the Cat

Image of the Day: Skinning the Cat

By | July 17, 2017

This stack of polarized light micrographs depicts a vibrant ensemble of tissues, hair follicles, and vessels within a slice of cat skin.

0 Comments

Research shows that human immunity develops much earlier than previously thought, but functions differently in adults.

0 Comments

Synaptic connections and a new neuron type emerge in high-res images, which hold promise for mapping the complete connectome.

1 Comment

The 19th century biologist’s drawings, tainted by scandal, helped bolster, then later dismiss, his biogenetic law.

3 Comments

Time-lapse imaging shows the immune cells transferring chemical signals during pigment pattern formation in developing zebrafish.

0 Comments

image: Infographic: How the Zebrafish Got Its Stripes

Infographic: How the Zebrafish Got Its Stripes

By | May 1, 2017

Immune cells called macrophages shuttle cellular messages in the skin.

0 Comments

image: Image of the Day: Colorful Crystals

Image of the Day: Colorful Crystals

By | April 27, 2017

Thecla opisena butterfly wings get their unique luster from the crystalline structures in their scales (bottom right).

0 Comments

The lungs of extremely premature lambs supported in a closed, sterile environment that enables fluid-based gas exchange grow and develop normally, researchers report.

0 Comments

image: Scientists Stretch Neurons to Image Fine Structures

Scientists Stretch Neurons to Image Fine Structures

By | April 18, 2017

A double-expansion technique embeds brain tissue in the absorbent material of diapers to stretch out cells for easier visualization.

0 Comments

Popular Now

  1. Major German Universities Cancel Elsevier Contracts
  2. Running on Empty
    Features Running on Empty

    Regularly taking breaks from eating—for hours or days—can trigger changes both expected, such as in metabolic dynamics and inflammation, and surprising, as in immune system function and cancer progression.

  3. Most of Human Genome Nonfunctional: Study
  4. Identifying Predatory Publishers
AAAS