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The genomes of two species of water bears reveal clues about how they persist in extreme conditions, yet don’t resolve the animals’ debated evolutionary story.

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image: Image of the Day: Embryonic Ripples

Image of the Day: Embryonic Ripples

By | July 26, 2017

This fluttering clump of colorful cells is a zebrafish embryo, visualized by many stacked images.

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image: Turkish University Censors Research Study

Turkish University Censors Research Study

By | July 25, 2017

A cardiovascular surgeon’s research was rejected for publication because it referenced evolutionary theory. 

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Another case of HIV remission emerges, this time in a South African girl diagnosed as an infant and disease-free for more than eight years.

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Their waters served as refuges during ice ages, allowing for adaptation and the emergence of new species.

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image: Mammalian Immunity: What’s RNAi Got to Do with It?

Mammalian Immunity: What’s RNAi Got to Do with It?

By | July 21, 2017

A new study adds to the evidence that mammalian cells can use small interfering RNAs to defend against viruses, but questions remain about physiological importance.

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image: Image of the Day: A Swell Idea

Image of the Day: A Swell Idea

By | July 19, 2017

To improve the resolution of biological samples at the cellular level, researchers inflate tissues with “swellable polymers” so that they’re easier to see under the microscope.    

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image: Ebola Persistence Documented in Monkeys

Ebola Persistence Documented in Monkeys

By | July 17, 2017

In tissue samples from rhesus macaques, researchers find the virus in the same immune-privileged sites where Ebola has been found to persist in humans.

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image: Image of the Day: Skinning the Cat

Image of the Day: Skinning the Cat

By | July 17, 2017

This stack of polarized light micrographs depicts a vibrant ensemble of tissues, hair follicles, and vessels within a slice of cat skin.

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image: Bacteriophages to the Rescue

Bacteriophages to the Rescue

By | July 17, 2017

 Phage therapy is but one example of using biological entities to reduce our reliance on antibiotics and other failing chemical solutions.

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