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» drug resistance and developmental biology

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image: Sperm From Ovaries

Sperm From Ovaries

By | June 11, 2015

With the deletion of a single gene, female Japanese rice fish can produce sperm. 

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Resistance Fighter

By | June 1, 2015

Stuart Levy has spent a lifetime studying mechanisms of antibiotic resistance and crusading to abolish the use of antibiotics in animal feed.

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Dino Snouts from Chicken Beaks

By | May 13, 2015

Researchers tweak gene expression in chicken embryos that may have been crucial to the evolutionary transition from dinosaur noses to bird bills.

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Viral Protector

By | April 21, 2015

A retrovirus embedded in the human genome may help protect embryos from other viruses, and influence fetal development.

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Contributors

By | April 1, 2015

Meet some of the people featured in the April 2015 issue of The Scientist.

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Control ALT, Delete Cancer

By , , and | April 1, 2015

Treating cancer by shutting down the alternative lengthening of telomeres (ALT) pathway

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Professional Marksman

By | April 1, 2015

Charles Sawyers, who began his research career just as the genetic details of human oncogenes were emerging, codeveloped Gleevec, the quintessential targeted cancer therapy.

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Signaling Resistance

By | April 1, 2015

Activating signaling pathways, rather than individual genes, reveals roles for both growth and dedifferentiation in establishing resistance to cancer treatments.

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Toggling Between Life and Death

By | April 1, 2015

In estrogen receptor–positive breast cancer, the transcription factor IRF1 tips the balance between cellular suicide and survival through autophagy.

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image: From Many, One

From Many, One

By | April 1, 2015

Diverse mammals, including humans, have been found to carry distinct genomes in their cells. What does such genetic chimerism mean for health and disease?

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