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Lactobacillus parafarraginis metabolites hindered the growth of multiple, distantly related bacterial pathogens. 

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image: Hitting It Out of the Park

Hitting It Out of the Park

By | April 1, 2017

Cancer can be as evasive and slippery as a spitball, but new immunotherapies are starting to connect.

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image: How Cancers Evolve Drug Resistance

How Cancers Evolve Drug Resistance

By | April 1, 2017

Researchers unravel the sophisticated ways cancers evade treatments, including immunotherapies, designed to destroy them.

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image: Infographic: Mechanisms of Resistance

Infographic: Mechanisms of Resistance

By | April 1, 2017

Cancers appear to be able to evolve resistance to many of the therapies doctors have tried.

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image: WHO Lists Antibiotic Development Priorities

WHO Lists Antibiotic Development Priorities

By | February 27, 2017

The World Health Organization outlines critical-, high-, and medium-priority antibiotic development initiatives, calling on the public and private sectors to invest in additional R&D.

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image: Nose Bacterium Inhibits <em>S. aureus</em> Growth

Nose Bacterium Inhibits S. aureus Growth

By | July 27, 2016

A study on microbe versus microbe battles within the human nose yields a new antibiotic.

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image: Speaking of Microbiology

Speaking of Microbiology

By | June 21, 2016

A selection of notable quotes from the American Society for Microbiology’s annual meeting

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image: Resistance Fighter

Resistance Fighter

By | June 1, 2015

Stuart Levy has spent a lifetime studying mechanisms of antibiotic resistance and crusading to abolish the use of antibiotics in animal feed.

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image: Control ALT, Delete Cancer

Control ALT, Delete Cancer

By , , and | April 1, 2015

Treating cancer by shutting down the alternative lengthening of telomeres (ALT) pathway

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image: Professional Marksman

Professional Marksman

By | April 1, 2015

Charles Sawyers, who began his research career just as the genetic details of human oncogenes were emerging, codeveloped Gleevec, the quintessential targeted cancer therapy.

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