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image: Germany Sees Drastic Decrease in Insects

Germany Sees Drastic Decrease in Insects

By | October 18, 2017

A 27-year-long study finds insect biomass has declined by about 75 percent. 

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image: Symmetrical Eyes Indicate Dyslexia

Symmetrical Eyes Indicate Dyslexia

By | October 18, 2017

People who read normally tend to have one dominant eye while people with dyslexia do not, research shows.

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image: Compound Found in Red Wine Boosts Immune Cell Function

Compound Found in Red Wine Boosts Immune Cell Function

By | October 17, 2017

At low doses, resveratrol enhanced human T-cell activity in vitro, while at high doses it interfered with cell signaling. 

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image: Cancers Relapse by Feeding Off Immune Signals

Cancers Relapse by Feeding Off Immune Signals

By | October 16, 2017

In mice, the tumor cells are able to thwart the immune response that would kill them—but immunotherapy prevented the return of melanoma.

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image: Circadian Gene Linked to Severe Epilepsy in Children

Circadian Gene Linked to Severe Epilepsy in Children

By | October 11, 2017

Loss of the CLOCK protein, which researchers find is decreased in pediatric epilepsy patients, makes mice more prone to seizures during sleep.

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The dolphins and their trainers will search for the endangered porpoises and enclose them in a protected pen.

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image: How Animals and Plants Weather Hurricanes

How Animals and Plants Weather Hurricanes

By | October 6, 2017

Studies suggest not all critters fare well in extreme weather, though some thrive.

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image: Prizes Bigger than the Nobel

Prizes Bigger than the Nobel

By | October 5, 2017

The Nobel Prize may garner the most attention, but there are other biomedical awards at least as lucrative.

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Chemistry Nobel goes to Jacques Dubochet, Joachim Frank, and Richard Henderson. 

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image: Q&A with Michael Young, Nobel Laureate

Q&A with Michael Young, Nobel Laureate

By | October 2, 2017

Young talks with The Scientist about studying circadian rhythms in fruit flies, the applications of his work beyond Drosophila, and winning the prize. 

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