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image: Image of the Day: Hippocampal Jalapeno

Image of the Day: Hippocampal Jalapeno

By | August 30, 2017

To tease apart brain regions involved in forming versus remembering memories, scientists engineered mice whose brain cells could be manipulated and tagged.

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image: Image of the Day: A Heart is Born

Image of the Day: A Heart is Born

By | August 28, 2017

To track distinct populations of developing cardiovascular cells, scientists used pulses of electricity to introduce fluorescently labeled DNA into chick embryos.

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image: Notable Science Quotes

Notable Science Quotes

By | October 1, 2016

Roger Tsien R.I.P., predatory publishing, and diversity in science

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image: Nobel Laureate Roger Tsien Dies

Nobel Laureate Roger Tsien Dies

By | August 31, 2016

One of the pioneers in developing fluorescent proteins for biological studies was 64 years old.

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“Ultimate DISCO” uses a solvent that shrinks whole animals and preserves fluorescence for months.

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image: Grab ’n’ Glow

Grab ’n’ Glow

By | January 1, 2015

Engineered proteins can tether multiple fluorescent molecules to give a brighter signal—and that’s not all.

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image: Predicting Worm Lifespan

Predicting Worm Lifespan

By | February 13, 2014

Scientists engineer fluorescing nematodes to project the worms’ expected lifespans through flashes of light at just three days old.

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image: Glowing Green Eel

Glowing Green Eel

By | June 17, 2013

The Japanese freshwater eel is the first vertebrate found to produce a fluorescent protein, which may prove useful in the clinic.

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image: What Ever Happened to Douglas Prasher?

What Ever Happened to Douglas Prasher?

By | February 26, 2013

The first researcher to clone the gene for green fluorescent protein, but who was passed over for the 2008 Nobel Prize in Chemistry, is back in academic science.

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image: DayGlo Science

DayGlo Science

By | July 20, 2012

Biologist David Gruber studies radiant creatures and their fluorescent proteins.

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