The Scientist

» fluorescent protein

Most Recent

image: Notable Science Quotes

Notable Science Quotes

By | October 1, 2016

Roger Tsien R.I.P., predatory publishing, and diversity in science

0 Comments

image: Nobel Laureate Roger Tsien Dies

Nobel Laureate Roger Tsien Dies

By | August 31, 2016

One of the pioneers in developing fluorescent proteins for biological studies was 64 years old.

1 Comment

“Ultimate DISCO” uses a solvent that shrinks whole animals and preserves fluorescence for months.

0 Comments

image: Grab ’n’ Glow

Grab ’n’ Glow

By | January 1, 2015

Engineered proteins can tether multiple fluorescent molecules to give a brighter signal—and that’s not all.

0 Comments

image: Predicting Worm Lifespan

Predicting Worm Lifespan

By | February 13, 2014

Scientists engineer fluorescing nematodes to project the worms’ expected lifespans through flashes of light at just three days old.

0 Comments

image: Glowing Green Eel

Glowing Green Eel

By | June 17, 2013

The Japanese freshwater eel is the first vertebrate found to produce a fluorescent protein, which may prove useful in the clinic.

1 Comment

image: What Ever Happened to Douglas Prasher?

What Ever Happened to Douglas Prasher?

By | February 26, 2013

The first researcher to clone the gene for green fluorescent protein, but who was passed over for the 2008 Nobel Prize in Chemistry, is back in academic science.

9 Comments

image: DayGlo Science

DayGlo Science

By | July 20, 2012

Biologist David Gruber studies radiant creatures and their fluorescent proteins.

0 Comments

image: Live and In Color

Live and In Color

By | April 1, 2012

How to track RNA in living cells

2 Comments

image: Encrypting <em>E. coli</em>

Encrypting E. coli

By | September 26, 2011

Researchers design patterns of fluorescent protein expression to deliver secret messages.

3 Comments

Popular Now

  1. Major German Universities Cancel Elsevier Contracts
  2. Running on Empty
    Features Running on Empty

    Regularly taking breaks from eating—for hours or days—can trigger changes both expected, such as in metabolic dynamics and inflammation, and surprising, as in immune system function and cancer progression.

  3. Most of Human Genome Nonfunctional: Study
  4. Identifying Predatory Publishers
AAAS