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image: Image of the Day: Pocket Frogs

Image of the Day: Pocket Frogs

By | February 22, 2017

Four newly discovered species of night frog (Nyctibatrachus) are now counted among the smallest frogs in the world.

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NASA researchers have discovered ancient microbes locked inside minerals, suggesting a possible niche for interstellar life.

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image: Image of the Day: Gandalf’s Hat

Image of the Day: Gandalf’s Hat

By | February 13, 2017

A new species of amoeba, Arcella gandalfi, is covered in a shell that resembles a wizard’s hat.

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image: Toward Killing Cancer with Bacteria

Toward Killing Cancer with Bacteria

By | February 8, 2017

Researchers employ an engineered microbe to destroy tumor cells in mice.

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image: Image of the Day: Noisy Barriers

Image of the Day: Noisy Barriers

By | February 2, 2017

Traffic noise disrupts communication between dwarf mongooses and tree squirrels, according to a study.

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image: Cannibalism: Not That Weird

Cannibalism: Not That Weird

By | February 1, 2017

Eating members of your own species might turn the stomach of the average human, but some animal species make a habit of dining on their own.

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image: Discovering Novel Antibiotics

Discovering Novel Antibiotics

By | February 1, 2017

Three methods identify and activate silent bacterial gene clusters to uncover new drugs

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image: The Fungus that Poses as a Flower

The Fungus that Poses as a Flower

By | February 1, 2017

Mummy berry disease coats blueberry leaves with sweet, sticky stains that smell like flowers, luring in passing insects to spread fungal spores.

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image: Restoring a Native Island Habitat

Restoring a Native Island Habitat

By | January 30, 2017

Removal of non-native vegetation from an island ecosystem revives pollinator activity and, in turn, native plant growth. 

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image: Image of the Day: Creepy Crawlers

Image of the Day: Creepy Crawlers

By | January 30, 2017

Scientists discover the alien-like Aethiocarenus burmanicus, a 100 million-year old insect with a triangular head and bulging eyes.

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