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image: Evidence for Human Lifespan Limit Contested

Evidence for Human Lifespan Limit Contested

By | June 28, 2017

Five groups of scientists criticize a widely publicized Nature paper from 2016 suggesting that humans can only live up to 115 years.

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The discovery of peptides, enzymes, and other gene products that confer antibiotic resistance could give clues to how it develops.

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image: Mutation Linked to Longer Life Span in Men

Mutation Linked to Longer Life Span in Men

By | June 19, 2017

A deletion in a growth hormone receptor gene is tied to an average of 10 extra years of life among men, but not women, according to a study.

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image: Art’s Diagnosticians

Art’s Diagnosticians

By | June 12, 2017

Physicians peer into the subjects of artistic masterpieces, and find new perspective on their own approach to diagnosing maladies.

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image: Trump Picks National Cancer Institute Director

Trump Picks National Cancer Institute Director

By | June 12, 2017

Ned Sharpless currently leads the cancer center at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill.

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image: ASM to Discontinue Small Conferences

ASM to Discontinue Small Conferences

By | June 6, 2017

Numerous scientists are disappointed with the American Society for Microbiology’s decision, and some are hatching plans to keep the meetings alive.

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image: Opinion: The Virome and the Anti-vaccination Debate

Opinion: The Virome and the Anti-vaccination Debate

By | June 6, 2017

Advances in microbiome research are increasingly used in anti-vaccination arguments, yet the science actually undermines the premise of the argument.

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Lactobacillus parafarraginis metabolites hindered the growth of multiple, distantly related bacterial pathogens. 

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Researchers are beginning to uncover a link between activity level and the microbial makeup of one’s gut.

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image: Book Excerpt from <em>Behave</em>

Book Excerpt from Behave

By | June 1, 2017

In the book’s introduction, author and neuroendocrinologist Robert Sapolsky explains his fascination with the biology of violence and other dark parts of human behavior.

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