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By analyzing the genomes of 161 dog breeds, scientists discover how and when certain canine breeds emerged.

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The lungs of extremely premature lambs supported in a closed, sterile environment that enables fluid-based gas exchange grow and develop normally, researchers report.

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The state’s board of education approves new standards that ease up on having students dig into scientific issues relevant to “intelligent design” arguments.

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image: An Epigenetic Aging Clock for Mice

An Epigenetic Aging Clock for Mice

By | April 21, 2017

Scientists predict rodents’ ages by assessing DNA methylation markers in various tissues.

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A protein found in human umbilical cord plasma improves synaptic plasticity, learning, and memory in aged mice.

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image: Image of the Day: Stop Signals

Image of the Day: Stop Signals

By | April 17, 2017

Transcytosis, suppression of vesicle traffic across cells, helps reduce permeability in the blood-retinal barrier during development.

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A mouse study reveals a causal link between changes in intestinal microbiota and increasing inflammation as the rodents age.

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image: New Giant Virus Group Reported

New Giant Virus Group Reported

By | April 6, 2017

A genomic analysis of “Klosneuviruses” suggests that they evolved from small viruses that accumulated genetic material over time, but not all virologists are convinced. 

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image: Study: Diet Contributes to Brain Size

Study: Diet Contributes to Brain Size

By | March 30, 2017

The results of a historical primate behavior analysis suggest that species with fruit-filled diets evolved larger brains.

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image: Image of the Day: Senior Scientists

Image of the Day: Senior Scientists

By | March 28, 2017

The aging science and engineering workforce in the U.S. can be traced back to the Baby Boomer cohort of researchers and the elimination of mandatory retirement in universities.

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