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image: Computers That Can Smell

Computers That Can Smell

By | May 1, 2017

Teams of modelers compete to develop algorithms for estimating how people will perceive a particular odor from its molecular characteristics.

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Contributors

By | May 1, 2017

Meet some of the people featured in the May 2017 issue of The Scientist.

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The 19th century biologist’s drawings, tainted by scandal, helped bolster, then later dismiss, his biogenetic law.

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image: Future Homes May Have Bioreactive Walls

Future Homes May Have Bioreactive Walls

By | May 1, 2017

Researchers are redesigning the humble brick to produce electricity, clean water and air, and to harvest valuable compounds.

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Glia Guru

By | May 1, 2017

Ben Barres recast glial cells from supporting actors to star performers, crucial for synaptic plasticity in the brain and for preventing neurodegenerative disorders.

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Learning Your Stripes

By | May 1, 2017

Science’s lowest common denominator has always been patterns.

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Myelin Basics

By | May 1, 2017

May Profilee Ben Barres of Stanford University discusses how understanding the basic biology of myelination could help patients with multiple sclerosis and other diseases.

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image: Understanding Body Ownership and Agency

Understanding Body Ownership and Agency

By | May 1, 2017

Understanding how people recognize and control their own bodies could help researchers develop therapies for those who’ve lost their sense of self.

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The giant lizards have numerous microbicidal compounds in their blood.

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From fish harvests to cottonwood forests, organisms display evidence that species change can occur on timescales that can influence ecological processes.

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