The Scientist

» DNA repair

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image: New Way to Edit Genes

New Way to Edit Genes

By | October 1, 2015

Researchers develop a more-efficient method for rewriting DNA that could hold therapeutic value for HIV and other diseases.


image: Age-Old Questions

Age-Old Questions

By | March 1, 2015

How do we age, and can we slow it down?

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image: How We Age

How We Age

By | March 1, 2015

From DNA damage to cellular miscommunication, aging is a mysterious and multifarious process.

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image: Wrangling Retrotransposons

Wrangling Retrotransposons

By , and | March 1, 2015

These mobile genetic elements can wreak havoc on the genome. Researchers are now trying to understand how such activity contributes to the aging process.


image: Beneficial Brew

Beneficial Brew

By | June 1, 2014

Drinking green tea appears to boost the activity of DNA repair enzymes.


image: Maria Spies: Molecular Machinist

Maria Spies: Molecular Machinist

By | April 1, 2014

Associate Professor, Biochemistry, University of Iowa, Age: 40


image: Brain Activity Breaks DNA

Brain Activity Breaks DNA

By | March 24, 2013

Researchers find that temporary double-stranded DNA breaks commonly result from normal neuron activation—but expression of an Alzheimer’s-linked protein increases the damage.


image: Why Women’s Eggs Don’t Last

Why Women’s Eggs Don’t Last

By | February 13, 2013

As reproductive tissues age, DNA repair mechanisms become less efficient, causing genomic damage to accumulate.


image: Virus Monopolizes Host’s Repairmen

Virus Monopolizes Host’s Repairmen

By | November 29, 2012

Human cytomegalovirus fixes its broken DNA by exclusively co-opting its host’s repair proteins.


image: Six Threats to Chromosomes

Six Threats to Chromosomes

By | May 3, 2012

Researchers identify two new DNA repair systems, in addition to four that were already known, that can attack unprotected telomeres.



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