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image: Eye on the Fly

Eye on the Fly

By | January 1, 2015

Automating Drosophila behavior screens gives researchers a break from tedious observation, and enables higher-throughput, more-quantitative experiments than ever before.

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image: Mirrors May Not Be Enemies

Mirrors May Not Be Enemies

By | October 10, 2014

New research shows that using mirrors to elicit aggressive behavior from animals may not be a fool-proof plan.

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image: Seeing Red

Seeing Red

By | August 1, 2014

Reef fish, once thought to be unable to see red wavelengths, not only fluoresce deep red, but males of some species react to seeing their own bioluminescent pattern.

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image: Book Excerpt from Rough and Tumble

Book Excerpt from Rough and Tumble

By | April 1, 2013

In Chapter 3, “Tamping the Simian Urge,” author Travis Rayne Pickering contrasts the brute physicality of predatory chimpanzees with the headier hunting style employed by humans.

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | April 1, 2013

Meet some of the people featured in the April 2013 issue of The Scientist.

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image: The Roots of Violence

The Roots of Violence

By | April 1, 2013

Archaeology can shine needed light on the evolution of our aggressive tendencies.

6 Comments

image: The Making of a Bully

The Making of a Bully

By | January 25, 2013

Adolescent rats exposed to stress grow into pathologically aggressive adults, behaviors that may be explained by accompanying epigenetic changes and altered brain activity.

5 Comments

image: Behavior Brief

Behavior Brief

By | October 17, 2011

A round-up of recent discoveries in behavior research

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