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image: Scientists Edit Viable Human Embryos in U.S.

Scientists Edit Viable Human Embryos in U.S.

By | July 27, 2017

The embryos, whose genes were altered by CRISPR, were not intended for implantation. 

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Two freely available databases include data on hundreds of human cancer cell lines. 

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image: Most of Human Genome Nonfunctional: Study

Most of Human Genome Nonfunctional: Study

By | July 17, 2017

An estimate derived from fertility rates concludes that at least 75 percent of our DNA has no critical utility.

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image: First Genetic Screen of Pigs Using ENU

First Genetic Screen of Pigs Using ENU

By | July 14, 2017

Using the mutagenic chemical N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea, researchers confirm the role of a gene in a piglet deformity and identify potential models for human diseases. 

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Genomic analysis of an oak tree that lived during Napoleon’s time supports the idea that plants somehow avoid the accumulation of mutations in their stem cells.

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Research shows that human immunity develops much earlier than previously thought, but functions differently in adults.

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The publicly available database found nearly a third of samples included mutations targeted by either approved drugs or therapies in clinical trials. 

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The 19th century biologist’s drawings, tainted by scandal, helped bolster, then later dismiss, his biogenetic law.

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Time-lapse imaging shows the immune cells transferring chemical signals during pigment pattern formation in developing zebrafish.

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image: Infographic: How the Zebrafish Got Its Stripes

Infographic: How the Zebrafish Got Its Stripes

By | May 1, 2017

Immune cells called macrophages shuttle cellular messages in the skin.

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