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image: Great Lakes Gray Wolf to Retain Endangered Status

Great Lakes Gray Wolf to Retain Endangered Status

By | August 2, 2017

A US Court of Appeals ruled that the Interior Department acted prematurely in removing the animals from the endangered species list.

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image: Tasmanian Devil Cancer Immunotherapy

Tasmanian Devil Cancer Immunotherapy

By | March 13, 2017

Researchers in Australia claim to have successfully used immunotherapy to treat devil facial tumor disease.

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image: Historical Hunts

Historical Hunts

By | January 1, 2017

See images from a century of fur trapping and hunting in the Amazon basin.

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image: Cheetah Range Drops 90 Percent

Cheetah Range Drops 90 Percent

By | December 27, 2016

Estimating only 7,100 individuals remaining, researchers urge a reclassification of the species from vulnerable to endangered.

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image: Taming Bushmeat

Taming Bushmeat

By | January 1, 2015

Chinese farmers’ efforts at rearing wild animals may benefit conservation and reduce human health risks.

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image: Bats Make a Comeback

Bats Make a Comeback

By | December 22, 2014

Citizen-scientist data obtained through the U.K.’s National Bat Monitoring Programme show that populations of 10 bat species have stabilized or are growing.

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image: Antibiotic Resistance Among Wildlife

Antibiotic Resistance Among Wildlife

By | December 11, 2014

Even animals that live far from humans are developing resistance to antibiotics.

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image: Global Wildlife Decline

Global Wildlife Decline

By | October 1, 2014

Vertebrate populations have fallen by half during the last 40 years, according to a report from the World Wildlife Fund.

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image: Birds and Choppers Don’t Mix

Birds and Choppers Don’t Mix

By | March 5, 2014

A new study finds that birdstrike is a huge threat to US Army, Navy, Coast Guard, and Air Force helicopters operating within the United States.

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image: Air Traffic

Air Traffic

By | March 1, 2014

Scientists use DNA sequencing to identify what’s attracting birds to airports, where midair collisions with planes can be devastating.

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