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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | February 1, 2017

Meet some of the people featured in the February 2017 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Infographic: Following the Force

Infographic: Following the Force

By | February 1, 2017

Physical forces propagate from the outside of cells inward and vice versa.

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image: May the Force Be with You

May the Force Be with You

By | February 1, 2017

The dissection of how cells sense and propagate physical forces is leading to exciting new tools and discoveries in mechanobiology and mechanomedicine.

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | April 1, 2016

Meet some of the people featured in the April 2016 issue of The Scientist.

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image: The Forces of Cancer

The Forces of Cancer

By | April 1, 2016

A tumor’s physical environment fuels its growth and causes treatment resistance.

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image: Under Pressure

Under Pressure

By | April 1, 2016

The causes and consequences of physical forces in the tumor microenvironment

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image: Modern Rehab

Modern Rehab

By | December 1, 2015

See the soldier whose recovery from a debilitating muscle injury was greatly aided by a cellular therapy plus physical therapy.

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image: Cellular Rehab

Cellular Rehab

By | December 1, 2015

Physical therapy and exercise are critical to the success of cell therapies approaching the clinic.

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image: Fluke Forces

Fluke Forces

By | April 1, 2014

Dolphins prove that they rely on muscle power, rather than a trick of fluid dynamics, to race through water at high speeds.

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image: Tail Flick

Tail Flick

By | April 1, 2014

Observe a dolphin flipping its fluke through a bubble curtain in experiments used to determine the force of its muscles.

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