Most Recent

image: An Evolutionary History

An Evolutionary History

By | October 1, 2016

Celebrating 30 years and a resurrection

0 Comments

image: Ciliates Are Genetic-Code Deviants

Ciliates Are Genetic-Code Deviants

By | October 1, 2016

Traditional stop codons have a double meaning in the protozoans' mRNA, sometimes calling for an amino acid during translation.

0 Comments

image: Do Brighter Species’ Brains Emit Redder Light?

Do Brighter Species’ Brains Emit Redder Light?

By | October 1, 2016

Photon emissions in the brain are red-shifted in more-intelligent species, though scientists dispute what that means.

0 Comments

image: Protozoans Found With No Dedicated Stop Codons

Protozoans Found With No Dedicated Stop Codons

By | October 1, 2016

Some ciliates use the same trio of nucleotides to code for an amino acid and to stop translation.

0 Comments

image: Saving Jon

Saving Jon

By | October 1, 2016

Meet the researcher/entrepreneur who started a nonprofit that seeks to solve the science behind a rare disease that threatens the life of her younger brother.

0 Comments

image: Some Human Cancers Exhibit Low-grade Inflammation

Some Human Cancers Exhibit Low-grade Inflammation

By | October 1, 2016

NSAIDs reduce this “parainflammation,” hinting at how they help lower cancer risk.

0 Comments

image: New and Old Techniques in Modern Neuroscience

New and Old Techniques in Modern Neuroscience

By | October 1, 2016

Imaging and manipulating the brain has come a long way from electrodes and the patch clamp, though such traditional tools remain essential.

0 Comments

image: Scientists Catch Translation in the Act

Scientists Catch Translation in the Act

By | October 1, 2016

Newly developed techniques from four different groups rely on the same basic steps to track translation in live cells.

0 Comments

image: Thirty Years of Progress

Thirty Years of Progress

By | October 1, 2016

Since The Scientist published its first issue in October 1986, life-science research has transformed from a manual and often tedious task to a high-tech, largely automated process of unprecedented efficiency.

1 Comment

image: Bacteria and Humans Have Been Swapping DNA for Millennia

Bacteria and Humans Have Been Swapping DNA for Millennia

By | October 1, 2016

Bacteria inhabit most tissues in the human body, and genes from some of these microbes have made their way to the human genome. Could this genetic transfer contribute to diseases such as cancer?

0 Comments

Popular Now

  1. Monsanto Buys Rights to CRISPR
    The Nutshell Monsanto Buys Rights to CRISPR

    The US agribusiness secures a global, nonexclusive licensing agreement from the Broad Institute to use the gene-editing technology for agricultural applications.

  2. Does Productivity Diminish Research Quality?
  3. How Plants Evolved Different Ways to Make Caffeine
  4. ESP on Trial
    Foundations ESP on Trial

    In the 1930s, parapsychologist Joseph Banks Rhine aimed to use scientific methods to confirm the existence of extrasensory perception, but faced criticisms of dubious analyses and irreproducible results.

RayBiotech