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image: Scientists Fear DACA Cancellation

Scientists Fear DACA Cancellation

By and | September 4, 2017

Some researchers are at risk of job loss and even deportation if Trump decides to end a program that allows undocumented immigrants who arrived in the U.S. as children to obtain work permits. 

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image: Baby on Board

Baby on Board

By | September 1, 2017

Many scientific conferences offer child care options that allow researchers to bring their families along for the trip.

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image: Bacteriophages to the Rescue

Bacteriophages to the Rescue

By | July 17, 2017

Phage therapy is but one example of using biological entities to reduce our reliance on antibiotics and other failing chemical solutions.

6 Comments

image: Book Excerpt from <em>Natural Defense</em>

Book Excerpt from Natural Defense

By | July 17, 2017

In Chapter 3, “The Enemy of Our Enemy Is Our Friend: Infecting the Infection,” author Emily Monosson makes the case for bacteriophage therapy in the treatment of infectious disease.

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image: Art’s Diagnosticians

Art’s Diagnosticians

By | June 12, 2017

Physicians peer into the subjects of artistic masterpieces, and find new perspective on their own approach to diagnosing maladies.

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image: Bone Marrow Isn’t the Only Source of Platelets

Bone Marrow Isn’t the Only Source of Platelets

By | June 1, 2017

Scientists have estimated that about half of murine platelet production occurs in the lungs.

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image: Book Excerpt from <em>Behave</em>

Book Excerpt from Behave

By | June 1, 2017

In the book’s introduction, author and neuroendocrinologist Robert Sapolsky explains his fascination with the biology of violence and other dark parts of human behavior.

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image: Genes’ Composition Guides More-Optimal Diets

Genes’ Composition Guides More-Optimal Diets

By | June 1, 2017

Fruit flies and mice grow better and eat less when the amino acid balance of their food reflects that coded by their exomes.

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The human brain’s insular cortex is adept at registering distaste for everything from rotten fruit to unfamiliar cultures.

1 Comment

image: Long-Term Memory Storage Begins Immediately

Long-Term Memory Storage Begins Immediately

By | June 1, 2017

In mice, cells in the prefrontal cortex—where memories are maintained long-term—start to encode a fearful experience right from the start.

1 Comment

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