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image: Image of the Day: Stop Signals

Image of the Day: Stop Signals

By | April 17, 2017

Transcytosis, suppression of vesicle traffic across cells, helps reduce permeability in the blood-retinal barrier during development.

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image: Image of the Day: Double Dose

Image of the Day: Double Dose

By | March 29, 2017

Scientists engineered the Artemisia annua plant to produce twice the normal amount of artemisinin, the main component in many malaria treatments.

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image: Image of the Day: Tubular Origins

Image of the Day: Tubular Origins

By | March 23, 2017

Murine neural tubes, with each image highlighting a different embryonic tissue type (blue). The neural tube itself (left) grows into the brain, spine, and nerves, while the mesoderm (middle) develops into other organs, and the ectoderm (right) forms skin, teeth, and hair.

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image: Image of the Day: Mouth Guards

Image of the Day: Mouth Guards

By | March 17, 2017

Grass cell stomata have a set of subsidiary cells flanking their guard cells, allowing the moisture-regulating portals to react more quickly to environmental conditions.

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Researchers report growing a mouse embryo using two types of early stem cells.

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image: Infant Brain Scans May Predict Autism Diagnosis

Infant Brain Scans May Predict Autism Diagnosis

By | February 17, 2017

A computer algorithm can identify the brains of autism patients with moderate accuracy based on scans taken at six months and one year of age.

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image: Scientists Offer Lab Space for Stranded Peers

Scientists Offer Lab Space for Stranded Peers

By | February 1, 2017

Researchers in Europe and Canada are offering temporary bench and desk spaces to host scientists denied entry into the U.S. as a result of the President’s executive order on immigration.

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image: 19th Century Experiments Explained How Trees Lift Water

19th Century Experiments Explained How Trees Lift Water

By | February 1, 2017

A maple branch and shattered equipment led to the cohesion-tension theory, the counterintuitive claim that water’s movement against gravity involves no action by trees.

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image: A Walk on the Wild Side

A Walk on the Wild Side

By | February 1, 2017

Plants have so much to teach us.

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Researchers solve the mystery of 15-year-old mutant ferns with disrupted sex determination.

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