The Scientist

» deafness

Most Recent

image: Lending an Ear

Lending an Ear

By | September 1, 2015

Until recently, auditory brainstem implants have been restricted to patients with tumors on their auditory nerves.

0 Comments

image: Gene Therapy Fixes Mouse Hearing

Gene Therapy Fixes Mouse Hearing

By | July 9, 2015

Expressing a gene for a component of the inner ear’s hair cells treated a form of genetic deafness.

0 Comments

image: Cochlear Implant Gene Therapy

Cochlear Implant Gene Therapy

By | April 23, 2014

The surgically implanted device can be tweaked to provide short electric bursts that send a nerve-growing gene into local cells, a study on guinea pigs shows.

0 Comments

image: Sensing Gene Therapy

Sensing Gene Therapy

By | March 31, 2013

Scientists are using genetic techniques to target diseases that affect how we see, hear, smell, taste, and feel.

1 Comment

image: Dual Adaptation in Deaf Brains

Dual Adaptation in Deaf Brains

By | February 12, 2013

The brains of people who cannot hear adapt to process vision-based language, in addition to brain changes associated with the loss of auditory input. 

0 Comments

image: Deaf Mice Hear Again

Deaf Mice Hear Again

By | January 10, 2013

A drug applied to the ears of deaf mice has prompted the regrowth of noise-damaged hair cells and resulted in slight improvements in the animals’ hearing.

1 Comment

image: The Pliable Brain

The Pliable Brain

By | September 1, 2012

Altered touch perception in deaf people may reveal individual differences in brain plasticity.

0 Comments

image: Deafness Gene Heightens Touch

Deafness Gene Heightens Touch

By | November 20, 2011

People with a defect in an ion channel that causes deafness are more sensitive to certain types of touch.

3 Comments

Popular Now

  1. How Fats Influence the Microbiome
  2. Hearing Help
    Features Hearing Help

    For decades, the only remedies for hearing loss were devices such as hearing aids or cochlear implants. Now, the first pharmaceutical treatments may be on the way.
     

  3. Psychology’s Failure to Replicate
  4. The Great Big Clean-Up
    Features The Great Big Clean-Up

    From tossing out cross-contaminated cell lines to flagging genomic misnomers, a push is on to tidy up biomedical research.

Advertisement
ProteinSimple
ProteinSimple
Advertisement
Life Technologies