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» DNA barcoding

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image: Spiders, Prey Leave DNA

Spiders, Prey Leave DNA

By | November 30, 2015

A study of black widow spiders suggests that the arachnids leave traces of their own genetic material and DNA from prey in their sticky webs.

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image: Keys to the Minibar

Keys to the Minibar

By | March 1, 2014

Degraded DNA from museum specimens, scat, and other sources has thwarted barcoding efforts, but researchers are filling in the gaps with mini-versions of characteristic genomic stretches.

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image: The Benefits of Barcoding

The Benefits of Barcoding

By | March 1, 2014

Watch DNA barcoder Mehrdad Hajibabaei from the University of Guelph describe the technology’s potential.

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image: New Bug on the Block

New Bug on the Block

By | December 9, 2013

Scientists have identified a species of cockroach never before seen in the U.S., which was spotted last summer on Manhattan’s West Side.

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image: Inauthentic Herbals

Inauthentic Herbals

By | November 6, 2013

Using DNA barcoding, researchers show that herbal products are often contaminated or contain alternative compounds and fillers.

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image: Limber LIMS

Limber LIMS

By | January 1, 2013

Using laboratory information management systems (LIMS) to automate and streamline laboratory tasks: three case studies

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image: Flower Barcodes

Flower Barcodes

By | June 28, 2012

Wales creates a database of DNA barcodes for all of its native flowering plants, hoping to guide conservation and drug development efforts.

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image: A Can of Worms

A Can of Worms

By | June 1, 2012

Scientists at the American Museum of Natural History use DNA barcoding to show that even sardines infected with nematodes can still be kosher.

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image: DNA to Nab Illegal Fishers

DNA to Nab Illegal Fishers

By | May 24, 2012

A new SNP assay can determine the geographical origin of commonly overexploited fish species.

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image: Bushmeat Roulette

Bushmeat Roulette

By | April 1, 2012

Pathogens lurk in illegal wildlife products confiscated at US airports.

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