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image: AAAAA Is for Arrested Translation

AAAAA Is for Arrested Translation

By | July 24, 2015

Multiple consecutive adenosine nucleotides can cause protein translation machinery to stall on messenger RNAs.

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image: Mauro Costa-Mattioli: Memory’s Puppeteer

Mauro Costa-Mattioli: Memory’s Puppeteer

By | February 1, 2015

Associate Professor, Department of Neuroscience, Baylor College of Medicine. Age: 39

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image: Enzyme Design

Enzyme Design

By | December 3, 2014

Researchers create synthetic enzymes in the lab, encoded by artificial genetic material.

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image: Ruben Gonzalez Jr.: Molecular Visualizer

Ruben Gonzalez Jr.: Molecular Visualizer

By | September 1, 2014

Associate Professor and Director of Graduate Studies, Department of Chemistry, Columbia University. Age 42

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image: Neurodegeneration and Protein Translation Linked

Neurodegeneration and Protein Translation Linked

By | July 24, 2014

Researchers find that a type of neurodegeneration in mice is linked to ribosomal stalling during protein translation in the brain.

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image: RNA Puts Proteins in a Headlock

RNA Puts Proteins in a Headlock

By | May 20, 2014

A noncoding RNA initiates translation by grabbing hold of repressor proteins and restricting their functions.

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image: Bacterial Persisters

Bacterial Persisters

By | January 1, 2014

A bacterial gene shuts down the cell's own protein synthesis, which sends the bacterium into dormancy and allows it to outlast antibiotics.

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image: Peter Cornish: Ribosome Cowboy

Peter Cornish: Ribosome Cowboy

By | July 1, 2013

Assistant Professor, Biochemistry, University of Missouri. Age: 35

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image: Drug Mechanism Questioned

Drug Mechanism Questioned

By | June 25, 2013

A study fails to confirm that the small molecule PTC124, in development for multiple genetic disorders, aids in read-through of premature stop codons.

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image: Antibiotic Bouncer

Antibiotic Bouncer

By | March 1, 2013

Contrary to previous assumptions that macrolide antibiotics completely block the exit tunnel of ribosomes, new evidence shows that some peptides are allowed to pass.

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