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image: Warm-Blooded Fish

Warm-Blooded Fish

By | May 15, 2015

The opah, or moonfish, is a deep-sea fish that regulates its body temperature more like a mammal than any of its finned kin, researchers have determined.

2 Comments

image: The Dark Side of Light

The Dark Side of Light

By | May 14, 2015

Artificially extended days cause mice to gain fat and alter the function of their brown fat, a study shows.

1 Comment

image: Dino Snouts from Chicken Beaks

Dino Snouts from Chicken Beaks

By | May 13, 2015

Researchers tweak gene expression in chicken embryos that may have been crucial to the evolutionary transition from dinosaur noses to bird bills.

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image: Prominent Cell Biologist Dies

Prominent Cell Biologist Dies

By | May 4, 2015

Cytoskeleton specialist Alan Hall was best known for unpacking the roles of Rho GTPases.   

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image: Viral Protector

Viral Protector

By | April 21, 2015

A retrovirus embedded in the human genome may help protect embryos from other viruses, and influence fetal development.

1 Comment

image: Gut Microbes Influence Circadian Clock

Gut Microbes Influence Circadian Clock

By | April 16, 2015

Metabolites produced by gut microbes in mice can affect the animals’ circadian rhythm and metabolism. 

2 Comments

image: Cellular Garbage Disposal Illuminated

Cellular Garbage Disposal Illuminated

By | April 13, 2015

A Harvard team shows how cells label and recognize proteins for degradation.

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image: 2015 Top 10 Innovations: Enter Today!

2015 Top 10 Innovations: Enter Today!

By | April 13, 2015

Submissions are officially open for this year’s Top 10 Innovations contest.

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image: A Benefit of Failed Pregnancy?

A Benefit of Failed Pregnancy?

By | April 9, 2015

Scientists find a common genetic variant in mothers that decreases the chance of successful pregnancy.

7 Comments

image: Book Excerpt from <em>p53</em>

Book Excerpt from p53

By | April 1, 2015

In Chapter 12, "Of Mice and Men," author Sue Armstrong recounts the point at which researchers moved from working with p53 in tissue culture to studying the gene in animal models.

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