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The Nobel laureate and Lasker awardee developed tools that facilitated decades of genetics research, including starch gel electrophoresis and gene targeting.

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image: Immune Defect Detected in Knockout Mice

Immune Defect Detected in Knockout Mice

By | May 20, 2016

Researchers have identified a mutation in a commonly used commercial mouse strain that could impact experimental results.

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image: Inhibiting Sperm Protein Causes Infertility

Inhibiting Sperm Protein Causes Infertility

By | October 5, 2015

Two drugs targeting a protein in sperm cause reversible infertility in male mice, providing new hope for a male contraceptive.

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image: Passenger Mutations Can Skew Results

Passenger Mutations Can Skew Results

By | July 7, 2015

Some genetically engineered mice harbor unwanted mutations that hitchhike alongside desired modifications, affecting experimental outcomes.

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image: Binge-Drinking Trigger?

Binge-Drinking Trigger?

By | May 12, 2015

Researchers identify a protein linked to excessive consumption of alcohol in animal models.

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image: CRISPR Knock-in Mouse Debuts

CRISPR Knock-in Mouse Debuts

By | September 29, 2014

Researchers have created a line of model mice that naturally express Cas9, paving the way for rapid precision gene-editing.

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image: Another Obesity-Associated Gene

Another Obesity-Associated Gene

By | March 13, 2014

Researchers find a new gene connected to obesity in a surprising part of the genome.

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image: First, Do No Harm…

First, Do No Harm…

By | June 9, 2011

Is DNA damage an inevitable consequence of epigenetic reprogramming?

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