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image: Gene Jumped to All Three Domains of Life

Gene Jumped to All Three Domains of Life

By | December 1, 2014

By horizontal gene transfer, an antibacterial gene family has dispersed to a plant, an insect, several fungi, and an archaeon.

1 Comment

image: New Genes = New Archaea?

New Genes = New Archaea?

By | October 15, 2014

Genes acquired from bacteria contributed to the origins of archaeal lineages, a large-scale phylogenetic analysis suggests.

1 Comment

image: Interspecies RNA Shuffle

Interspecies RNA Shuffle

By | August 14, 2014

Researchers report the first example of large-scale RNA-based communication between species—a parasitic plant and two of its hosts. 

2 Comments

image: Genomes Gone Wild

Genomes Gone Wild

By | January 1, 2014

Weird and wonderful, plant DNA is challenging preconceptions about the evolution of life, including our own species.

4 Comments

image: Bacteria Can Integrate Degraded DNA

Bacteria Can Integrate Degraded DNA

By | November 18, 2013

In lab experiments, bacteria usurp small, damaged fragments of DNA, including those from a 43,000-year-old woolly mammoth.  

2 Comments

image: Bacteria Trade Genes

Bacteria Trade Genes

By | October 1, 2013

Extremophiles living in Antarctica’s salty Deep Lake exchange genes much more often than previously observed in nature.

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image: Going Viral

Going Viral

By | September 1, 2013

Bacteriophages shuttle genes between diverse ecosystems.

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image: Going Viral

Going Viral

By | September 1, 2013

From therapeutics to gene transfer, bacteriophages offer a sustainable and powerful method of controlling microbes.

6 Comments

image: Bacterial DNA in Human Genomes

Bacterial DNA in Human Genomes

By | June 20, 2013

A new study finds strong evidence that bacteria can transfer genes into human genomes, especially in cancer cells.

6 Comments

image: Algae Get Help to Go to Extremes

Algae Get Help to Go to Extremes

By | March 7, 2013

A red alga appears to have adapted to extremely hot, acidic environments by collecting genes from bacteria and archaea.

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