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image: Lost Memories Reactivated in Mice

Lost Memories Reactivated in Mice

By | May 29, 2015

Using optogenetics, researchers excite selected neurons to reinstate a fear memory that had been blocked.

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image: Ebola’s Cellular Key

Ebola’s Cellular Key

By | May 27, 2015

Scientists studying the basic molecular steps of Ebola infection identify a mammalian protein that is essential for the pathogen to infect mice.

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image: Gene Linked to Pain Insensitivity

Gene Linked to Pain Insensitivity

By | May 27, 2015

People with a congenital disorder that makes them unable to feel pain have mutations in a histone-modifying gene. 

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image: Light Sensors in Cephalopod Skin

Light Sensors in Cephalopod Skin

By | May 21, 2015

Squid, cuttlefish, and octopuses possess vision machinery in their skin.

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image: Image of the Day: Amazing Astrocytes

Image of the Day: Amazing Astrocytes

By | May 19, 2015

They aren't neurons, but in rats, glial cells in the brain called astrocytes (red) play a major role in repetitive motions like chewing and breathing.

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image: Opinion: New Models for ASD

Opinion: New Models for ASD

By | May 14, 2015

The study of mini “brains” in a dish, derived from patient cells, offers a novel approach for autism spectrum disorder research.

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image: Dino Snouts from Chicken Beaks

Dino Snouts from Chicken Beaks

By | May 13, 2015

Researchers tweak gene expression in chicken embryos that may have been crucial to the evolutionary transition from dinosaur noses to bird bills.

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image: Liberia Declared Free of Ebola

Liberia Declared Free of Ebola

By | May 12, 2015

After the West African nation goes more than a month with no new reported cases of viral infection, the World Health Organization says the country is Ebola-free.

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image: Long-Lived Virus

Long-Lived Virus

By | May 8, 2015

New research suggests Ebola can survive on surfaces for days and can be transmitted via semen.

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image: Mouse Mind Control

Mouse Mind Control

By | May 4, 2015

Researchers use chemicals to manipulate the behavior of mice.

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