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» ebola, developmental biology and immunology

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image: Ebola Mutation Rate Quibble

Ebola Mutation Rate Quibble

By | March 27, 2015

A study suggests that the virus may not be evolving as quickly as a previous group estimated.

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image: Ebola Vax Trial Update

Ebola Vax Trial Update

By | March 26, 2015

A novel Ebola vaccine being tested in China is safe and provokes a notable immune response in people, according to a Phase 1 trial.

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image: Short, Strong Signals

Short, Strong Signals

By | March 25, 2015

Methylation increases both the activity and instability of the signaling protein Notch.

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image: WHO: Ramp Up Vaccination

WHO: Ramp Up Vaccination

By | March 23, 2015

The World Health Organization is calling for an increase in routine vaccinations for measles and other preventable diseases in Ebola-affected countries.

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image: T Cells of the Skin

T Cells of the Skin

By | March 18, 2015

A census of adaptive immune system components in human skin reveals a variety of resident and traveling memory T cells.

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image: Elevated Measles Risk in Ebola-Stricken Regions

Elevated Measles Risk in Ebola-Stricken Regions

By | March 13, 2015

Decreased vaccination rates could lead to a deadlier measles outbreak, according to a study.

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image: Fighting Allergy with Allergen

Fighting Allergy with Allergen

By | February 25, 2015

Babies who ate peanuts were less likely to develop an allergy to the food by the time they hit kindergarten, according to a new study.

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image: Rapid Ebola Test Approved

Rapid Ebola Test Approved

By | February 24, 2015

The World Health Organization OKs the first 15-minute Ebola diagnostic test.

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image: Ebola Victims Still Infectious a Week After Death

Ebola Victims Still Infectious a Week After Death

By | February 12, 2015

Ebola virus can remain infectious for up to seven days on the bodies of monkeys that died from the disease, researchers show.

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image: Long-Lived Immunotherapy Stem Cells

Long-Lived Immunotherapy Stem Cells

By | February 4, 2015

Genetically modified T memory stem cells persist in patients for more than 10 years, and can differentiate into a variety of T cell types.

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