Advertisement

The Scientist

» science history

Most Recent

image: New Blood, circa 1914

New Blood, circa 1914

By | April 1, 2014

World War I provided testing grounds for novel blood-transfusion techniques.

0 Comments

image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | March 1, 2014

The Sixth Extinction, Joy, Guilt, Anger, Love, Ha! The Science of When we Laugh and Why, and Ten Thousand Birds

1 Comment

image: Discovering Archaea, 1977

Discovering Archaea, 1977

By | March 1, 2014

Ribosomal RNA fingerprints reveal the three domains of life.

0 Comments

image: Syphilis: Then and Now

Syphilis: Then and Now

By , , and | February 1, 2014

Researchers are zeroing in on the origin of syphilis and related diseases, which continue to plague the human population some 500 years after the first documented case.

12 Comments

image: Drawn to Controversy

Drawn to Controversy

By | January 1, 2014

By digging through dusty storerooms and reading dead people’s mail, science historian and philosopher Michael Dietrich keeps biologists attuned to the past and mindful of the present.

0 Comments

image: Renard's Menagerie

Renard's Menagerie

By | January 1, 2014

Some of the fantastical marine life depicted in a rare, 18th-century book

0 Comments

image: Speaking of Science

Speaking of Science

By | January 1, 2014

January 2014's selection of notable quotes

0 Comments

image: Harrowing Egg Hunt, 1911

Harrowing Egg Hunt, 1911

By | December 1, 2013

Three members of Robert Falcon Scott’s Terra Nova Antarctic expedition team trudged 225 kilometers in the dead of winter to retrieve emperor penguin eggs in an effort to establish an evolutionary link between birds and reptiles.

1 Comment

image: One Man's Trash...

One Man's Trash...

By | December 1, 2013

Scientists who dared to waste their time looking at the midbody, a remnant of cell division, have catapulted the organelle to new prominence.

2 Comments

image: Protein Sequencing Disputes Linnaeus

Protein Sequencing Disputes Linnaeus

By | November 6, 2013

Comparing the proteins of a 300-year-old pickled elephant fetus with modern sequence data challenges Carl Linnaeus’s decision to assign it as the Asian elephant type specimen.

0 Comments

Follow The Scientist

icon-facebook icon-linkedin icon-twitter icon-vimeo icon-youtube
Advertisement
INTEGRA Biosciences
INTEGRA Biosciences

Stay Connected with The Scientist

  • icon-facebook The Scientist Magazine
  • icon-facebook The Scientist Careers
  • icon-facebook Neuroscience Research Techniques
  • icon-facebook Genetic Research Techniques
  • icon-facebook Cell Culture Techniques
  • icon-facebook Microbiology and Immunology
  • icon-facebook Cancer Research and Technology
  • icon-facebook Stem Cell and Regenerative Science
Advertisement