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image: The Celiac Surge

The Celiac Surge

By | June 1, 2017

A rapid increase in the global incidence of the condition has researchers scrambling to understand the causes of the trend, and cope with the consequences.

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image: Parasitic Worm Spreads in Hawaii

Parasitic Worm Spreads in Hawaii

By | April 11, 2017

The roundworm that causes rat lungworm disease has infected at least six people on the island of Maui in the last three months.

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Despite an overall decrease in the number of US cancer deaths, some cancer types are on the rise, and disparities remain between genders and ethnicities.

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image: Cooking Up Cancer?

Cooking Up Cancer?

By | April 1, 2017

Overcooked potatoes and burnt toast contain acrylamide, a potential carcinogen that researchers have struggled to reliably link to human cancers.

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image: Wael Al-Delaimy: An American Scientist Born in Iraq

Wael Al-Delaimy: An American Scientist Born in Iraq

By | February 16, 2017

The 49-year-old epidemiologist immigrated to the U.S. in 2000 for a postdoc position. He’s now a professor of family medicine and public health.

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image: Famed Statistician and Data Visualizer Dies

Famed Statistician and Data Visualizer Dies

By | February 8, 2017

Hans Rosling of the Karolinska Institute has passed away at age 68.

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image: Autism Not Linked to Flu or Flu Shot During Pregnancy

Autism Not Linked to Flu or Flu Shot During Pregnancy

By | November 29, 2016

A study of nearly 200,000 children finds no increased risk for autism among kids whose moms caught the flu or received a flu vaccine while pregnant.

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image: Q&A: Zika Damages Mouse Testes, Reduces Fertility

Q&A: Zika Damages Mouse Testes, Reduces Fertility

By | October 31, 2016

Michael Diamond of the Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis and colleagues tracked the virus in the male mouse reproductive tract over several weeks.

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Based on epidemiological data, researchers estimate that reducing exposures to certain environmental chemicals could drop people’s chances of developing the disease.

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Whole-genome sequencing of preserved blood samples provides the clearest picture to date of the virus’s arrival and spread in the U.S.

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