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The plant Lophophytum pilfers mitochondrial genes from the species it parasitizes.

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image: Study: One Wasp Takes Control of Another

Study: One Wasp Takes Control of Another

By | January 25, 2017

Crypt keeper wasps appear to command crypt gall wasps to dig exit tunnels on their behalf.

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image: Slumber Numbers

Slumber Numbers

By | March 1, 2016

Ideas abound for why some animal species sleep so much more than others, but definitive data are elusive.

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image: NYC Rats Harbor Plague Fleas

NYC Rats Harbor Plague Fleas

By | March 3, 2015

Researchers find Oriental rat fleas, the insects that can carry plague bacteria, on New York City-dwelling rodents.

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image: The Ultimate Game of Cat and Mouse

The Ultimate Game of Cat and Mouse

By | September 18, 2013

Toxoplasma gondii seems to cause hard-wired changes in the brains of mice that persist even after the parasite is gone.

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image: Ants on Burglar Watch

Ants on Burglar Watch

By | May 22, 2013

An ant species that lives on a carnivorous pitcher plant keeps nutrient thieves from escaping by eating them.

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image: Ladybird Bioterrorists

Ladybird Bioterrorists

By | May 16, 2013

The Asian harlequin ladybird carries a biological weapon to wipe out competing species.

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image: Deep Doo-doo

Deep Doo-doo

By | January 4, 2013

An open-access study explores the intricacies of parasite egg distribution and viability in human feces.

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image: Natural-Born Doctors

Natural-Born Doctors

By | October 23, 2012

Bees, sheep, and chimps are just a few of the animals known to self-medicate. Can they teach us about maintaining our own health?

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image: A Parasite’s Parasites

A Parasite’s Parasites

By | October 15, 2012

French scientists identify a new giant virus, which carries the genome of a smaller virus and a new breed of mobile DNA.

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