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image: Can Amyloid Spread Between Brains?

Can Amyloid Spread Between Brains?

By | September 9, 2015

A study of deceased patients who received injections of cadaver-derived growth hormone hints at the possible transmissibility of Alzheimer’s disease. 

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image: Neurodegeneration’s Spread

Neurodegeneration’s Spread

By | August 4, 2014

Researchers show that pathogenic protein aggregates that accumulate within neurons and are a hallmark of Huntington’s disease can propagate from cell to cell.


image: Protein Clumps Spread Inflammation

Protein Clumps Spread Inflammation

By | June 22, 2014

ASC specks—protein aggregations that drive inflammation—are released from dying immune cells, expanding the reach of a defense response.

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image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | May 1, 2014

Madness and Memory, Promoting the Planck Club, The Carnivore Way, and The Tale of the Dueling Neurosurgeons


image: Prions Important for Memories

Prions Important for Memories

By | February 19, 2014

The formation of long-term memories employs the chain-forming habits of prions.  

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image: Stranger than Fiction

Stranger than Fiction

By | January 1, 2014

Plant biology: You can't make this stuff up.

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image: Contributors


By | January 1, 2014

Meet some of the people featured in the January 2014 issue of The Scientist.


image: The Bright Side of Prions

The Bright Side of Prions

By | January 1, 2014

Associated with numerous neurological diseases, misfolded proteins may also play decisive roles in normal cellular functioning.  


image: Prion-like Proteins Cause Disease

Prion-like Proteins Cause Disease

By | March 3, 2013

Normal proteins with regions resembling disease-causing prions are responsible for an inherited disorder that affects the brain, muscle, and bone.


image: Prions Involved in Learning

Prions Involved in Learning

By | February 15, 2013

Properly folded prions aid in normal brain development.


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