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image: 45 Feet High and Rising

45 Feet High and Rising

By | April 24, 2017

Maize enthusiast Jason Karl aims to continue breaking his own records for the tallest corn plants ever grown.

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image: Monsanto Buys Rights to CRISPR

Monsanto Buys Rights to CRISPR

By | September 27, 2016

The US agribusiness secures a global, nonexclusive licensing agreement from the Broad Institute to use the gene-editing technology for agricultural applications.

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image: Opinion: GMOs Are Not “Frankenfoods”

Opinion: GMOs Are Not “Frankenfoods”

By and | August 30, 2016

It behooves the scientific community to reflect on the public’s “Franken-” characterization of genetically modified foods.

9 Comments

image: Gene Editing Without Foreign DNA

Gene Editing Without Foreign DNA

By | February 1, 2016

Scientists perform plant-genome modifications on crops without using plasmids.

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image: Light-Tolerant Tomatoes

Light-Tolerant Tomatoes

By | August 7, 2014

Upping the expression of a single gene improves the plant’s ability to withstand light and increases yields. 

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image: A Lot to Chew On

A Lot to Chew On

By | June 1, 2014

Complex layers of science, policy, and public opinion surround the things we eat and drink.

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image: Better Biofuel Crops

Better Biofuel Crops

By | July 1, 2012

One way to increase biofuel production is to engineer plants that can withstand harsh environmental conditions, thereby expanding the range in which such crops can be grown. 

4 Comments

image: Biofuels by the Numbers

Biofuels by the Numbers

By | July 1, 2012

Of the many available no- or low-carbon methods to harvest energy, including wind, geothermal, hydroelectric, and solar approaches, conversion of plant biomass to liquid fuels is the most cost-effective strategy.

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Growing Better Biofuel Crops

By | July 1, 2012

Research is underway to reduce the use of food crops for biofuels by shifting to dedicated energy crops and agricultural residues.

1 Comment

image: Revenge of the Weeds

Revenge of the Weeds

By | May 20, 2012

Plant pests are evolving to outsmart common herbicides, costing farmers crops and money.

33 Comments

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