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image: Male Fish Borrows Egg to Clone Itself

Male Fish Borrows Egg to Clone Itself

By | May 24, 2017

A fish created by spontaneous androgenesis is the first known vertebrate to arise naturally by this asexual reproductive phenomenon. 

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Speciation and development of new traits may not always go hand-in-hand.

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Standard taxonomy lumps together bird species that should be separate, a new study suggests, raising the total number of estimated species from 9,000 to 18,000.

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image: Revered Biologist Dies

Revered Biologist Dies

By | April 27, 2016

Rick Harrison, an evolutionary biologist known for his research on speciation, has passed away at age 70.

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image: How to Make a New Species

How to Make a New Species

By | July 1, 2015

Scientists mutate a mating pheromone and its corresponding receptor in yeast to promote speciation.

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image: “King of Noses”

“King of Noses”

By | September 24, 2014

New hadrosaur uncovered in Utah hints at surprising speciation.  

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image: Meal Plans

Meal Plans

By | August 1, 2014

Bacterial populations’ differing strategies for responding to their environment can set genetic routes to speciation.

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image: Monkey See, Monkey Don’t

Monkey See, Monkey Don’t

By | June 30, 2014

Species in a tightly knit genus of Old World primates have evolved tell-tale facial characteristics to prevent hybridization, a study shows.

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image: Top 10 New Species

Top 10 New Species

By | May 23, 2014

The International Institute for Species Exploration announces its picks of novel species discovered in the past year, including a carnivorous mammal, a tiny shrimp, and a fungus.

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image: New Species Abound

New Species Abound

By | December 26, 2013

A look at 2013’s noteworthy new species

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