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image: Image of the Day: Saltwater Survivors

Image of the Day: Saltwater Survivors

By | January 9, 2017

When road deicing salt enters freshwater ecosystems, prey species such as Daphnia pulex can rapidly evolve tolerance to the contaminant, buffering their local food webs from the impacts of salination.

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image: Sugar Time

Sugar Time

By | March 1, 2016

Metabolic activity, not light, drives the circadian clock in cyanobacteria.

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image: Behavior Brief

Behavior Brief

By | September 2, 2015

A round-up of recent discoveries in behavior research

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image: Meal Plans

Meal Plans

By | August 1, 2014

Bacterial populations’ differing strategies for responding to their environment can set genetic routes to speciation.

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image: La Bohème: A Portrait of Our Oceans in Peril

La Bohème: A Portrait of Our Oceans in Peril

By | March 15, 2013

The sculptures of Mara G. Haseltine's new exhibition tell a tale of beautiful oceans ravaged by pollution.

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image: Love Song for an Ailing Planet

Love Song for an Ailing Planet

By | March 15, 2013

Artist Mara G. Haseltine unveils her latest exhibition of science-inspired sculpture, a melancholy ode to marine plankton set to the music of Puccini.

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image: Behavior Brief

Behavior Brief

By | September 11, 2012

A round-up of recent discoveries in behavior research

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image: Whirlpool Bistros

Whirlpool Bistros

By | April 1, 2012

Fish adapt to feed for months along the entire depth of massive oceanic whirlpools that are rich in nutrients and plankton.

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