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image: Man and Bird Chat While Honey Hunting

Man and Bird Chat While Honey Hunting

By | July 25, 2016

A study suggests that humans and avians in sub-Saharan Africa communicate to find and mutually benefit from the sweet booty.

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image: Primates, Gut Microbes Evolved Together

Primates, Gut Microbes Evolved Together

By | July 21, 2016

Symbiotic gut bacteria evolved and diverged along with ape and human lineages, researchers find. 

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image: Another Dinosaur with Short Arms Discovered

Another Dinosaur with Short Arms Discovered

By | July 14, 2016

Gualicho shinyae evolved small limbs independently of T. rex, researchers report.

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People returning from the Olympic and Paralympic Games in Brazil will not substantially affect viral transmission in most participating countries, according to the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

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image: Zika Update

Zika Update

By | July 5, 2016

Sexual transmission more common than thought; NIH to track infections among Olympians; Zika-related birth defects draw attention to another common virus

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image: Hot Off the Presses

Hot Off the Presses

By | July 1, 2016

The Scientist reviews Serendipity, Complexity, The Human Superorgasism, and Love and Ruin

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image: Multicellular Cooperation Curbs Cheating

Multicellular Cooperation Curbs Cheating

By | July 1, 2016

An experimental evolution study shows that more cheaters arise when bread mold fungal cells are less related to one another.

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image: Notable Science Quotes

Notable Science Quotes

By | July 1, 2016

Human Genome Project-Write; viruses are alpha predators; Zika and the Olympics

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image: Source of Scales, Feathers, Hair

Source of Scales, Feathers, Hair

By | June 27, 2016

Reptiles, birds, and mammals all produce tiny, bump-like structures during development.   

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World Health Organization concludes the events are unlikely to worsen the viral outbreak.

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