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There is little evidence that full treatment durations discourage the development of drug-resistant bacteria.

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image: Shotgun Sequencing Outdone by Amplicon

Shotgun Sequencing Outdone by Amplicon

By | August 8, 2017

The shotgun approach, typically thought to be the superior method, may substantially underestimate diversity in environments that have not already been classified, researchers find.

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image: The Ever-Expanding T-Cell World: A Primer

The Ever-Expanding T-Cell World: A Primer

By | August 7, 2017

Researchers continue to identify new T-cell subtypes—and devise ways to use them to fight cancer. The Scientist attempts to catalog them all.

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image: Fascinated by Folding

Fascinated by Folding

By | August 4, 2017

Lila Gierasch uses biochemical tools to understand how linear chains of amino acids turn into complex three-dimensional structures.

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A new method stimulates B cells to make human antigen-specific antibodies, obviating the need for vaccinating blood donors or hunting for rare B cells.

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image: Image of the Day: Wrinkly, Crinkly Coral

Image of the Day: Wrinkly, Crinkly Coral

By | July 24, 2017

True to its name, the corrugated coral's (Pavona varians) skeleton forms intricate patterns of alternating ridges and furrows.

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image: Bacteriophages to the Rescue

Bacteriophages to the Rescue

By | July 17, 2017

Phage therapy is but one example of using biological entities to reduce our reliance on antibiotics and other failing chemical solutions.

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image: Book Excerpt from <em>Natural Defense</em>

Book Excerpt from Natural Defense

By | July 17, 2017

In Chapter 3, “The Enemy of Our Enemy Is Our Friend: Infecting the Infection,” author Emily Monosson makes the case for bacteriophage therapy in the treatment of infectious disease.

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Using single-cell RNA sequencing, scientists characterize new populations of dendritic cells and monocytes.

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The presence of similar light-emitting enzymes in the distantly related organisms lends new insight into bioluminescence evolution.

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