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There is little evidence that full treatment durations discourage the development of drug-resistant bacteria.

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image: Shotgun Sequencing Outdone by Amplicon

Shotgun Sequencing Outdone by Amplicon

By | August 8, 2017

The shotgun approach, typically thought to be the superior method, may substantially underestimate diversity in environments that have not already been classified, researchers find.

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image: Image of the Day: Wrinkly, Crinkly Coral

Image of the Day: Wrinkly, Crinkly Coral

By | July 24, 2017

True to its name, the corrugated coral's (Pavona varians) skeleton forms intricate patterns of alternating ridges and furrows.

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image: Bacteriophages to the Rescue

Bacteriophages to the Rescue

By | July 17, 2017

Phage therapy is but one example of using biological entities to reduce our reliance on antibiotics and other failing chemical solutions.

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image: Book Excerpt from <em>Natural Defense</em>

Book Excerpt from Natural Defense

By | July 17, 2017

In Chapter 3, “The Enemy of Our Enemy Is Our Friend: Infecting the Infection,” author Emily Monosson makes the case for bacteriophage therapy in the treatment of infectious disease.

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The bacteria also promoted the growth of human colon cancer cells in a dish.

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image: Anti-CRISPR Protein Reduces Off-Target Effects

Anti-CRISPR Protein Reduces Off-Target Effects

By | July 12, 2017

AcrIIA4, an inhibitor protein from the Listeria bacteriophage, can block DNA from binding to Cas9 during genome editing.

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image: Image of the Day: Flushing the Gut

Image of the Day: Flushing the Gut

By | June 19, 2017

In response to a bacterial infection, an immune signal in mice's guts triggers a molecular cascade that promotes diarrhea, which, researchers demonstrate, is important for ridding them of the bacteria.  

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Research shows that human immunity develops much earlier than previously thought, but functions differently in adults.

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Scientists expand the microbial tree of life by publishing more than 1,000 novel reference genomes.  

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