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image: Image of the Day: Wrinkly, Crinkly Coral

Image of the Day: Wrinkly, Crinkly Coral

By | July 24, 2017

True to its name, the corrugated coral's (Pavona varians) skeleton forms intricate patterns of alternating ridges and furrows.

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image: Bacteriophages to the Rescue

Bacteriophages to the Rescue

By | July 17, 2017

 Phage therapy is but one example of using biological entities to reduce our reliance on antibiotics and other failing chemical solutions.

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image: Book Excerpt from <em>Natural Defense</em>

Book Excerpt from Natural Defense

By | July 17, 2017

In Chapter 3, “The Enemy of Our Enemy Is Our Friend: Infecting the Infection,” author Emily Monosson makes the case for bacteriophage therapy in the treatment of infectious disease.

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The bacteria also promoted the growth of human colon cancer cells in a dish.

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image: Anti-CRISPR Protein Reduces Off-Target Effects

Anti-CRISPR Protein Reduces Off-Target Effects

By | July 12, 2017

AcrIIA4, an inhibitor protein from the Listeria bacteriophage, can block DNA from binding to Cas9 during genome editing.

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image: Image of the Day: Flushing the Gut

Image of the Day: Flushing the Gut

By | June 19, 2017

In response to a bacterial infection, an immune signal in mice's guts triggers a molecular cascade that promotes diarrhea, which, researchers demonstrate, is important for ridding them of the bacteria.  

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Scientists expand the microbial tree of life by publishing more than 1,000 novel reference genomes.  

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image: Art’s Diagnosticians

Art’s Diagnosticians

By | June 12, 2017

Physicians peer into the subjects of artistic masterpieces, and find new perspective on their own approach to diagnosing maladies.

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Lactobacillus parafarraginis metabolites hindered the growth of multiple, distantly related bacterial pathogens. 

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image: Book Excerpt from <em>Behave</em>

Book Excerpt from Behave

By | June 1, 2017

In the book’s introduction, author and neuroendocrinologist Robert Sapolsky explains his fascination with the biology of violence and other dark parts of human behavior.

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