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image: Gut Feeling

Gut Feeling

By | June 22, 2017

Sensory cells of the mouse intestine let the brain know if certain compounds are present by speaking directly to gut neurons via serotonin.

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image: Image of the Day: Flushing the Gut

Image of the Day: Flushing the Gut

By | June 19, 2017

In response to a bacterial infection, an immune signal in mice's guts triggers a molecular cascade that promotes diarrhea, which, researchers demonstrate, is important for ridding them of the bacteria.  

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image: Sex Reversal Mystery Explained?

Sex Reversal Mystery Explained?

By | June 15, 2017

A proposed mechanism for how bearded dragons with male chromosomes hatch as females at high temperatures

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Scientists expand the microbial tree of life by publishing more than 1,000 novel reference genomes.  

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Lactobacillus parafarraginis metabolites hindered the growth of multiple, distantly related bacterial pathogens. 

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The new findings, obtained from cell culture experiments, could explain the link between infection with the virus during pregnancy and infant microcephaly.

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Contributors

By | June 1, 2017

Meet some of the people featured in the June 2017 issue of The Scientist.

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No Place to Hide

By | May 31, 2017

Environmental DNA is tracking down difficult-to-detect species, from rock snot in the U.S. to cave salamanders in Croatia.

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image: Grad Student Acquitted in Thesis-Sharing Case

Grad Student Acquitted in Thesis-Sharing Case

By | May 25, 2017

Diego Gomez was facing jail time in Colombia for posting someone else’s copyrighted thesis online.

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image: Image of the Day: Root Rave 

Image of the Day: Root Rave 

By | May 24, 2017

Pea plant (Pisum sativum) roots that have been inoculated with engineered Rhizobia bacteria glow in the presence of certain proteins. 

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