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» regeneration, microbiology and culture

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image: Microbe’s Diversity Is Vast, Ancient

Microbe’s Diversity Is Vast, Ancient

By | April 24, 2014

A marine cyanobacterium possesses astounding genomic diversity, yet still organizes into distinct subpopulations that have likely persisted for ages.

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image: Money Microbiome

Money Microbiome

By | April 24, 2014

Swabbing cash circulating in New York City reveals more than 3,000 different types of bacteria.

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image: Microbiome Influences

Microbiome Influences

By | April 22, 2014

Researchers find that gender, education level, and breastfeeding can affect humans’ commensal microbial communities.

1 Comment

image: How Artistic Brains Differ

How Artistic Brains Differ

By | April 18, 2014

A study reveals structural differences between the brains of artists and non-artists.

3 Comments

image: Researchers Regrow Mouse Thymus

Researchers Regrow Mouse Thymus

By | April 9, 2014

A simple genetic formula coaxes a shrunken mouse thymus to regenerate.  

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image: Lynne Quarmby - Artist

Lynne Quarmby - Artist

By | April 4, 2014

The professor of molecular biology and biochemistry at Simon Fraser University is also an accomplished painter.

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image: The Structure of Flowers

The Structure of Flowers

By | April 4, 2014

Architecture student-turned-artist Macato Murayama creates beautiful images inspired by the intricate anatomy of flowers.

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image: “Breakthrough” Tough to Reproduce

“Breakthrough” Tough to Reproduce

By | April 3, 2014

An independent group could not replicate the results of a highly cited heart regeneration protocol, while others say they have succeeded.  

4 Comments

image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | April 1, 2014

Cancer Virus, A Window on Eternity, Murderous Minds, and The Extreme Life of the Sea

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image: Dermatologically Derived

Dermatologically Derived

By | April 1, 2014

Inspired by turkey skin, researchers devise a bacteriophage-based sensor whose color changes upon binding specific molecules.

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