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» coral reefs, culture and developmental biology

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image: Image of the Day: Wrinkly, Crinkly Coral

Image of the Day: Wrinkly, Crinkly Coral

By | July 24, 2017

True to its name, the corrugated coral's (Pavona varians) skeleton forms intricate patterns of alternating ridges and furrows.

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image: Bacteriophages to the Rescue

Bacteriophages to the Rescue

By | July 17, 2017

Phage therapy is but one example of using biological entities to reduce our reliance on antibiotics and other failing chemical solutions.

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image: Book Excerpt from <em>Natural Defense</em>

Book Excerpt from Natural Defense

By | July 17, 2017

In Chapter 3, “The Enemy of Our Enemy Is Our Friend: Infecting the Infection,” author Emily Monosson makes the case for bacteriophage therapy in the treatment of infectious disease.

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image: Image of the Day: Wounded Coral

Image of the Day: Wounded Coral

By | July 13, 2017

Certain corals in the Gulf of Mexico were devastated by the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill’s reverberating destruction.

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image: Rampant Coral Bleaching Begins to Subside

Rampant Coral Bleaching Begins to Subside

By | June 23, 2017

The most destructive global coral bleaching event on record shows signs of remission in the Indian Ocean. 

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image: Image of the Day: Call the Coral Doctor

Image of the Day: Call the Coral Doctor

By | June 22, 2017

Scientists surveyed coral colonies in Hawaii for disease after a mystery pathogen caused tissue from the common rice coral (Montipora capitata) to degenerate.   

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Research shows that human immunity develops much earlier than previously thought, but functions differently in adults.

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image: Art’s Diagnosticians

Art’s Diagnosticians

By | June 12, 2017

Physicians peer into the subjects of artistic masterpieces, and find new perspective on their own approach to diagnosing maladies.

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image: Book Excerpt from <em>Behave</em>

Book Excerpt from Behave

By | June 1, 2017

In the book’s introduction, author and neuroendocrinologist Robert Sapolsky explains his fascination with the biology of violence and other dark parts of human behavior.

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The human brain’s insular cortex is adept at registering distaste for everything from rotten fruit to unfamiliar cultures.

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