The Scientist

» coral reefs and ecology

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More than half of the world’s land may have passed the threshold that threatens long-term sustainable development, researchers report.

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image: Amazonian Reef

Amazonian Reef

By | July 1, 2016

See footage from the expedition that discovered a coral reef hiding beneath the massive muddy plume at the mouth of the Amazon River.

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image: Hot Off the Presses

Hot Off the Presses

By | July 1, 2016

The Scientist reviews Serendipity, Complexity, The Human Superorgasism, and Love and Ruin

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image: Peter Tyack: Marine Mammal Communications

Peter Tyack: Marine Mammal Communications

By | July 1, 2016

The University of St. Andrews behavioral ecologist studies the social structures and behaviors of whales and dolphins, recording and analyzing their acoustic communications.

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image: Submerged Pigs Inform Forensics

Submerged Pigs Inform Forensics

By | July 1, 2016

Watching the decomposition of pig carcasses anchored to the seafloor is helping forensic researchers understand what to expect of human remains dumped in the ocean.

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image: The Earth's Changing Seas

The Earth's Changing Seas

By | July 1, 2016

Marine pathogens flourish in oceans that are warmer and more acidic.

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image: Well-Brined Pork

Well-Brined Pork

By | July 1, 2016

Watch what happens when marine organisms have their way with a sunken pig carcass.

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image: Changing Oceans Breed Disease

Changing Oceans Breed Disease

By | July 1, 2016

In the planet’s warming and acidifying oceans, species from corals to lobsters and fish are succumbing to pathogenic infection.

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image: Inside the Expedition Discovering New Coral Reefs

Inside the Expedition Discovering New Coral Reefs

By | July 1, 2016

As technology takes science deeper into the world’s oceans, researchers are discovering reef systems far from warm, shallow tropical waters.

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image: Bleached Corals “Sickest” Scientists Have Ever Seen

Bleached Corals “Sickest” Scientists Have Ever Seen

By | June 21, 2016

Researchers assess which parts of the Great Barrier Reef that have lost their vivid color are likely to die and which parts may pull through.

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