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image: Virtual Reality for Freely Moving Animals

Virtual Reality for Freely Moving Animals

By | August 21, 2017

Experiments that place untethered fish, flies, and mice in simulated environments give clues about the animals’ social behavior.

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image: First In Vivo Function Found for Animal Circular RNA

First In Vivo Function Found for Animal Circular RNA

By | August 10, 2017

Mice lacking the RNA had deregulated microRNAs in the brain, disrupted synaptic communication, and behavioral abnormalities associated with neuropsychiatric disorders.

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image: Bacteriophages to the Rescue

Bacteriophages to the Rescue

By | July 17, 2017

Phage therapy is but one example of using biological entities to reduce our reliance on antibiotics and other failing chemical solutions.

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image: Book Excerpt from <em>Natural Defense</em>

Book Excerpt from Natural Defense

By | July 17, 2017

In Chapter 3, “The Enemy of Our Enemy Is Our Friend: Infecting the Infection,” author Emily Monosson makes the case for bacteriophage therapy in the treatment of infectious disease.

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image: Art’s Diagnosticians

Art’s Diagnosticians

By | June 12, 2017

Physicians peer into the subjects of artistic masterpieces, and find new perspective on their own approach to diagnosing maladies.

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image: Book Excerpt from <em>Behave</em>

Book Excerpt from Behave

By | June 1, 2017

In the book’s introduction, author and neuroendocrinologist Robert Sapolsky explains his fascination with the biology of violence and other dark parts of human behavior.

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The human brain’s insular cortex is adept at registering distaste for everything from rotten fruit to unfamiliar cultures.

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image: Infographic: Plastics’ Effects

Infographic: Plastics’ Effects

By | June 1, 2017

Lab studies suggest that plastic pollutants in the environment could have detrimental effects on animals’ physiology.

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image: Binge-Eating Neurons Identified

Binge-Eating Neurons Identified

By | May 26, 2017

Inducing activity in the zona incerta region of the brain prompts mice to gorge themselves.

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Mouse experiments indicate that, contrary to observations in pregnant women, reactive oxygen species contribute to normal placental development.

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